The Two Extremes: How Fashion Headed For Mediocrity And Vulgarity

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The Two Extremes: How Fashion Headed For Mediocrity And Vulgarity
The Two Extremes: How Fashion Headed For Mediocrity And Vulgarity

Video: The Two Extremes: How Fashion Headed For Mediocrity And Vulgarity

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Video: Антон Долин – стыдные вопросы про кино / вДудь 2023, January
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Since the publication of the manifest column the outstanding fashion critic of The New York Times Katie Horin six months have passed. In her text, Katie urged designers to return to creating the usual wearable clothing needed by women, only a small number of whom have a need for conceptual fashion. And now, six months later, the brands, one after the other, present the cruise collections of the future 2015, by which one can largely judge the spring-summer collections. And one after another, they gravitate towards simplicity, or, even worse, towards what is commonly called rusticity: vulgarity.

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Olesya Iva

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On the 2015 Chanel cruise:

oversized silk floral dresses, incongruous prints, gold-plated trousers

with an elastic band and blouses with shuttlecocks

Off-season collections differ from the main ones (spring-summer and autumn-winter) with a commercial focus. The task of cruise and pre-fall items is extremely simple: take shelves and rails after sales, until new collections arrive in stores. Looking at the new collections in 2015, it becomes clear that most brands have reduced the degree of "conceptuality": some - like Louis Vuitton, Acne, Maison Martin Margiela - to understandability and wearability, and so much that it became boring; others - Chanel, Marc Jacobs, and on the verge of Michael Kors - have even gone to trash.

For example, brands with more advanced customers, such as Acne, simplify design and styling. The Swedes, who have shown bulky, angular, strange things for several seasons, presented just things for 2015 (shorts, trousers, denim jackets and skirts, white shirts), which the creative director of the brand Johnny Johansson called "realism." Another recent example: Raf Simons' couture collection for Christian Dior consisted of a third of overalls and dark-colored men's coats paired with identical turtlenecks and mixed trousers. For a couture show with rustling jewelery dresses, this is, frankly, atypical, but, on the other hand, why not present everyday clothes of the same jewelery work? After all, a perfectly tailored coat and trousers, no matter what the price, will be in great demand. The attention of designers to boredom is understandable - not every multibillion-dollar audience is an artist at heart. More often we are just people who, leaving work, do not mind buying something for themselves. Melancholy, indifference, blues, burdensomeness, apathy, lethargy, drowsiness, despondency visit people much more often than inspiration and desire to be original.

Another case is the appearance of thrash metal in collections. It's only five years since Swedish designer Ann Sofie Back showed off a tanga skirt at London Fashion Week, when the designer was inspired by Lindsay Lohan, who often appeared in the world without underwear. More than 30 years have passed since Jean-Paul Gaultier and John Galliano became the stars of kitsch. Apparently, during this time, designers missed kitsch and thrash and turned to vulgar things that are easily read by the audience.

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Lagerfeld was the first to define the trash trend, showing on the 2015 Chanel cruise oversized silk floral dresses, incongruous prints, gold-plated elasticated trousers and flounced blouses. In doing so, he proved that it is sales and marketers who drive modern fashion. Lagerfeld also made a curtsey towards the East, especially the Middle, and Eastern Europe: Dubai, Kuwait, Azerbaijan, Russia and Kazakhstan. Of course, the Far East is still important for brands (we remember well the Asian collections of 2012-2013), but it has already been widely mastered by luxury brands. Marc Jacobs used a radical trick, outside the territory of Saint Lourent creative director Hedi Slimane, who was one of the first to take on the idea of ​​wearable clothing in luxury homes ("Zara for adults").After a successful and sophisticated fall collection, Jacobs showed mini dresses in sequins, suits with bright prints and leopard mini boots. House of Holland, meanwhile, is writing the slogan from a '70s health care ad: "My Pussy, My Rules" on a shiny animal print bomber jacket. But who remembers this ad? Jeremy Scott offers pop and dubious ideas for the brand name and for Moschino that have a guaranteed effect on customers: a SpongeBob dress, a skirt with an elastic band from men's panties, a top made of a large vulgar mesh - everything works like T-shirts from Sharm el- Sheikh with captions like “Nobody is perfect. I am nobody. " However, this slogan would ideally fit the role of the motto of the new trend - mediocrity in fashion.

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If you compare fashion with the film industry, it's hard to make an art house every season and try to sell

tickets for it like a Hollywood hit

The brands whose things are classified as bad taste have always been and will always exist: Roberto Cavalli, Thomas Wylde, Philipp Plein. Things as simple as a board, cut, studded with rhinestones, skulls, acid and leopard prints, lace, are consistently in demand all over the world. And this is not surprising, because in order to wear things of complex architectural design, you need to have a certain level of taste, which you need to work on daily. Not everyone has the time, need and desire for this, but there is always a desire to buy something for themselves. A couple of glossy magazines, women's websites and TV shows are a more textured springboard for a mass buyer, and it's hard to fight this collective unconscious. If today Kim Kardashian, Rita Ora and Rihanna influence people's tastes more than authoritative critics, it's time for brands to make friends with them. It is quite difficult to be a commercially successful brand (which implies mass character) and at the same time an elite one. If you compare fashion to the film industry, it's hard to do art house every season and try to sell tickets to it as a Hollywood hit. And why, if you can shoot blockbusters right away?

Indicative and surprising in this respect is the new cruise collection of Christopher Kane, who has never had a shortage of ideas. Kane presented what modern kitsch and grotesque can look like: leopard print, neon and acid colors, lace, translucent underwear, transparent inserts, neon bra - something similar the designer showed at the beginning of his career. At the same time, it seems that never before has neon lace looked so good. “There’s no such thing as bad taste,” says Kane. Critics, undecided whether it was good or bad taste, blamed everything on modern post-taste. The designer succeeds perfectly in flirting with the style of ordinary people - in the collection's lookbook, the lace dress looks completely different than it could have looked on a Gipsy visitor, since it was worn on a masculine model with a haircut to zero. Kane changes meanings and it works: why should only candy girls wear sexy dresses, and masculine girls shapeless clothes? Let everything be exactly the opposite.

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For Moschino

Jeremy Scott made the visors

in the form of a spongebob

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The Japanese democratic brand Uniqlo has launched a new clothing line with the writer Ines de la Fressange, whose style is considered rather dubious - the icon of the French style Ines wears a beret, jacket, blouse with ruffles, ballet flats and necessarily a thin bright red belt and wears everything elegant, but provincial … Although the collection of the brand is clean, the combination of things at the presentation turned out to be exactly what the majority of buyers will accept, which is good for the brand and for sales. However, Ines herself says that fashion and good taste are made from bad taste. She compares fashion to perfumery: “To make a fantastic fragrance, you have to add something that smells bad to it. Then everything will fall into place. Those who look perfect are boring."

Vanessa Friedman, ex-fashion director of The Financial Times and current fashion director of The New York Times, says in an interview with The New York Times that there is nothing to be surprised at: “Fashion is becoming a global industry, and brand designers are more focused on business models. The division into commerce and concept is becoming a relic of the past. " For example, the Belgian avant-garde artist Dries Van Noten, who managed to build a successful brand while retaining its conceptuality, includes pink and gold lurex blouses and leopard T-shirts in off-season collections (which are not published anywhere, but they are in stores). And avant-garde brands like Comme des Garçons live primarily on the sale of perfumes and basic items like T-shirts and sneakers. Kira Plastinina, Sultanna Frantsuzova, Dasha Gauser, CAPSLOCKSHOP - all these controversial Russian designers and brands are commercially successful. From the point of view of style and fashion, this is, of course, sad, but from the point of view of experience for young Russian designers, it is an indicative example: it is better to decide in advance which commercial idea will allow sewing headsets and original bombers with a calm soul.

Jean-Paul Gaultier's slogan “Antifashion is fashion” is alive today as never before. Speaking about modern kitsch, one can recall how in 1989 the same Gaultier said in an interview for Vogue that now he “is broadcasting a moment in history when everything is confused”, and that he would like “people to open their eyes to things that seemed unacceptable to them, and they saw beauty where in a normal situation they did not expect to see it. " And these words describe well what is happening now. In addition, if you taste the trash, then even a lace neon dress can be worn and look cool, and Conchita Wurst can quite become a role model.

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