Salam Maskva: Pavel Bardin's Crime Series About Migrants

Salam Maskva: Pavel Bardin's Crime Series About Migrants
Salam Maskva: Pavel Bardin's Crime Series About Migrants

Video: Salam Maskva: Pavel Bardin's Crime Series About Migrants

Video: Migrant Camp Beneath Del Rio Border Bridge Cleared Out 2022, November
Anonim
Image
Image

DASHA TATARKOVA

A new series was launched in the online cinema of the first channel Pavel Bardin "Salam Maskva". The entire first season can be bought for 299 rubles - a week, however, only two episodes appear (by the standards of Netflix - leisurely, by the standards of domestic TV - just a gift). The series was supposed to go on the air three years ago, but for several years it lay on the shelf due to the caution of television people: policemen, bandits, and illegal migrants appear in the sharp plot. We will tell you why Salam Maskva is worth watching both for those who are looking for a good Russian TV series and for those who simply miss the strong police stories.

Migrants in the official picture of the world are a kind of community without a face, those about whom it is customary to talk in numbers, and on state channels they speak in terms of "influx" and "take action." Any city dweller sees them on the street every day - or rather, glances past. In society, there is a clear division into "us" and "them", publicly or tacitly accompanied by the verdict "come in large numbers" and "what have they forgotten here." Widespread social illiteracy and intolerance are entrenched in the official discourse, if only because no one speaks human language about migrants, although to devalue a huge part of society and not give it a word means stubbornly denying reality. Pavel Bardin and his TV series Salam Maskva are trying to bring the migrant issue out of the shadows and demarginalize those about whom it is not customary to talk and think about.

Unfriendliness and aggression towards migrants is sometimes explained by fear, no matter how paradoxical it may sound: we are afraid of what we do not understand. It seems that this works here regardless of nationality and age: the image of an external enemy is cultivated both at the state level and in a separate courtyard, fenced off by barriers. In the case of migrants, this fear doubles as the level of misunderstanding increases with their numbers. Social and cultural barriers - traditions, behavior, language in the end - result in the simplest fear “what are they discussing / thinking about there?”.

Moscow is a huge multicultural city. In the first year of linguistics, students are surprised to learn that they actually hear dozens of different languages ​​around them, because a foreign language for many is not only English, but also, say, Uzbek. Bardin immediately breaks down this wall of misunderstanding: opening the series with a scene in Dagestan, he supplies the conversation in Avar with subtitles. "Unexpectedly" the bandits talk about their bandit affairs - everyone, in general, already suspected it, but they still wanted to know for sure. In "Salam Maskwa" there is a place for a variety of diasporas that have long become a natural part of the city, from Tajik to Vietnamese - and they all get a little closer, it is worth breaking the language barrier.

Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image

The case begins in 2011. A young guy kills several men in a shootout on a mountainous Dagestan road. His name is Rustam, he is from a large mafia clan. Rustam works, nevertheless, as a policeman, not seeing a big contradiction in this: he tries to lead an honest life to the best of his ideas, helping both the "family" and those whom he must protect by law. A year later, he gets a partner - former operative Alexander Rebrov, a terrible xenophobe and alcoholic. As befits a good crime drama, Rebrov is summoned to the service in order to close the old tail - to put the crime boss Arslan behind bars. His actions, like circles on the water, affect everyone, from an unhappy couple of cops to very ordinary people like the girl Guli and her unlucky brother.

The drama of Bardeen fits perfectly into the tradition of buddy movies, films about partners whose relationships are built on contrasts.It would seem that there is no shortage of "cop serials" on Russian television, but "Salam Maskva", of course, is much bigger and better. Although there are police, mafia, and illegal immigrants, this is a solid, well-filmed and well-played crime story, which has a place on a par with "Gomorrah" or "Wiretapping", adjusted for Russian realities. Bardeen himself says that he wrote his series with an eye on the tradition of police action films, except that its main characters are much tougher towards each other, and on the other hand, the narrative does not lose a relatively light tone. There is a place for humor, sometimes returning the show somewhere in the reality of "Office Romance" (this is greatly facilitated by the soundtrack of Vasya Oblomov), but this is appropriate in its own way - the director manages to find a good balance between "tin" and life.

Bardin has always been interested in people “on the sidelines”: it does not matter whether they are skinheads in “Russia 88”, gopniks in “Gop-stop” or migrants in “Salam Maskva”, he regularly looks where the majority seem to have a blind spot. The main thing is that, looking at them, he sees in them first and last of all people. But how else: it is a little worth turning on empathy, digging deeper and taking a closer look, as it turns out that a representative of a certain culture is not just a figure in a ready-made frame of prejudices, but a person with his own fears, problems, joys and hopes. Bardin humanizes everyone, without justifying anyone: bandits, police officers, and illegal immigrants. Showing the world through this optics, he clearly makes it clear that there is no need to wait for a division into black and white: everything is complicated, people are complex and the choice before them is often difficult. Tolerance, according to Bardeen, is the ability to peer into a person without making him a preliminary verdict.

Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image

Bardeen tried to make the series as believable as possible - in particular, he studied the texture, going alone to the Caucasus; then, together with the team, he conducted casting and filming in Dagestan. The director says that he wanted to do everything for real, without changing locations, languages ​​and concepts - it's not for nothing that the main character is not a "Dagestani", but an Avar. In an interview, Bardeen says that, in addition to the serial story about tolerance, he is worried about the very real problem of the lack of opportunities for actors from the regions. Many of those who played in the show are those who are usually not given roles in Moscow, and most of the extras are ordinary residents, either migrants, or, when the action moves to Dagestan, local residents.

Do not forget that for all its severity, Salam Maskva is shown in the online cinema on Channel One. Although it was the federal channel that showed the equally sharp "Thaw" and "School", it was already several years ago. The series itself was also ready for three years already, but its airing was postponed all the time - so much so that it was released even not at night, but immediately on the website. Maybe this is good in its own way: in 2016, watching a streaming video is much easier than catching a series at a certain time. Journalists, however, note that due to this prescription of years, Salam Maskva looks like a monument to slightly different times.

But there is another problem as well. The Bardeen series will be relevant until there is a dialogue between people of different origins, and these times seem to be in the not very foreseeable future. Friendship of peoples, seemingly inherited from the USSR, degenerated into tense coexistence - and an acutely social, intelligent and worthy movie like Salam Maskwa could, as they say, “make the audience think”. It is a pity that, unfortunately, the series is unlikely to reach those who could be persuaded that the series did not get on the federal air.

Photos: First channel

Popular by topic