Scientists Have Figured Out Which Sections Of DNA Affect Propensity For Depression

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Scientists Have Figured Out Which Sections Of DNA Affect Propensity For Depression
Scientists Have Figured Out Which Sections Of DNA Affect Propensity For Depression

Video: Scientists Have Figured Out Which Sections Of DNA Affect Propensity For Depression

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American scientists analyzed more than 300 thousand DNA samples collected during the work of 23andMe, and found out which parts of the genetic code are responsible for a person's predisposition to depression. The research results are published in the scientific journal Nature Genetics.

Researchers have identified 17 single-nucleotide polymorphisms of 15 DNA regions that affect propensity for depression (data relevant for people of European descent). To get these results, the scientists compared DNA samples from 75,000 people diagnosed with major depressive disorder (MDD, or clinical depression) with the genes of 230,000 healthy people and found genetic variations that are more common in people with depression, and then further tested " suspicious "parts of the genome.

Most of these 15 regions contain genes that regulate the appearance of new neurons and the expression of proteins in them during brain development. Researchers have also found a link between MDD and other psychiatric disorders, in particular schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

This work was the first study to identify the genetic causes of depression: since depression is a complex disease that depends on both genetic causes and external factors, a large sample was needed for the study. They were able to obtain such a huge number of genetic samples thanks to the 23andMe service, a company that makes genetic tests for susceptibility to various diseases for private customers. Since the founding of 23andMe in 2006, more than a million people have used the service.

The researchers believe that the data will be able to develop new treatments and prevention of depression and other mental disorders.

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