The Compact Revolution: The Cosmetic Packaging That Changed The World

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The Compact Revolution: The Cosmetic Packaging That Changed The World
The Compact Revolution: The Cosmetic Packaging That Changed The World

Video: The Compact Revolution: The Cosmetic Packaging That Changed The World

Video: Custom luxury magnetic cosmetic lipstick packaging gift box for packaging lipstick developed by STPP 2022, November
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Innovations in decorative and caring cosmetics are associated with discovering new ingredients and improving textures more often than creating brand new packaging. As history shows, the form of a product changes less often than its formula, but if this happens, then a new bottle or applicator often transforms the entire category of products. The change is really important because packaging design solves problems not only in terms of looks, but also storage, hygiene and ease of application. Here are ten striking examples of packaging revolutions - from the turn of the century to the present day.

Compact powder

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Back at the end of the 19th century powder boxes made of precious metals were available only to wealthy ladies and were made to order from jewelers. The boxes were most often decorated with precious stones or the owner's initials. Women who were less fortunate with the origin or marriage did with the means at hand - they made powder boxes from cigarette cases, pill boxes and snuff boxes. In the XX century, the popularity of powder grew due to its active use in theater and cinema. The actresses powdered their faces to a state of perfect smoothness and by their very appearance made fans want to buy a magic powder. So, powder, along with the usual perfume and gloves, was included in the personal collection of Sarah Bernhardt.

The first compact powder with a sponge, similar to those we use now, was released in 1923 in England, and, according to the recollections of contemporaries, it was expensive. Gradually, with the development of plastic production, the powder box has evolved from a luxury item into a convenient disposable plastic container with compressed powder. The most famous powder released for everyone is Max Factor's famous Pan-Cake, originally created for shooting in technicolor and therefore having a fundamentally new texture and properties. Unlike traditional theatrical makeup, it did not reflect light, lay in an even layer and was little exposed to external influences, which means it was perfect for everyday use.

By the 1940s, compact powder had completely transformed and hit store shelves in a variety of shapes and colors. The owners 'initials on the lids of the powder boxes were replaced by the manufacturers' logos. At the same time, advertisements of Revlon, Helena Rubinstein, Max Factor and other cosmetic brands could be seen more and more often on the pages of women's magazines. Companies continued to use popular Hollywood actresses in their advertisements to sell women not only cosmetics, but also the dream of looking like a celebrity.

Roll-up lipstick

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Modern lipstick comes in a wide variety of formats and textures, but the classic remains a hard pencil in a twist-off tube. Lipstick, it seems, has always existed at all, but before the First World War, this tool was not intended to be carried with you at all: it was wrapped in silk and paper or placed in rather heavy jars, that is, the chances of painting lips and not getting your hands dirty were about zero … The new convenient lipstick case design was patented by James Bruce Mason in 1923: he conceived this design especially for products that shrink with use. The practical invention was appreciated, and over the next two decades, dozens of different types of roll-out lipsticks were patented in the United States.

The stick shape also has its own history. The ubiquitous Max Factor painted the lips of movie stars, emphasizing the "Cupid's bow", and in 1926 Helena Rubinstein introduced the world's first lipstick with a beveled heart-shaped top, which could easily outline the lips according to all the rules of fashion.

In the next decade, the tube became so convenient that it could be opened, twisted and closed with one hand.Many manufacturers had such automatic lipsticks: Automatic Lipstick and Golden Automatic from Helena Rubinstein, Ayer's Automatic Lipstick from Harriet Hubbard, Rouge Automatique from Guerlain. And in 2011, Guerlain released a whole collection of lipsticks from the past under the same name - it turned out very beautifully.

Mascara

with spiral brush

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Mascara gained popularity only in the 20s of the last century, and again thanks to the cinema. By that time, there were no problems with the formula of the remedy, but the discomfort in use was very noticeable. Women had to paint their eyelashes with a miniature brush, which left splashes on the eyebrows and eyelids. Remember the compact briquettes "Leningradskaya" from your mother's cosmetic bag and imagine the scale of your everyday nightmare.

Helena Rubinstein has a new word. In 1957, the company created Mascara-Matic, the first liquid mascara in a pencil case with a spiral applicator brush. Mascara, like lipstick, was promoted under the idea of ​​"automatic". Revlon, Max Factor, Maybelline and many other cosmetics companies have taken the idea and released their versions of the high-tech mascara. A couple of days ago we had the opportunity to test a new version of old brushes - this year they were repeated in the design of the two-phase mascara Hourglass The Curator Lash Instrument.

Liquid eyeliner

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Different types of eyeliners are another ancient type of eye makeup. In the 20th century, it was rethought many times, from thick smokey eyes to sharp feline arrows. Liquid eyeliner in the form of a felt-tip pen or bubble with a fine brush appeared in the 1960s and has shaped makeup trends for many years.

Thanks to the convenient built-in brush, it was possible to draw bold arrows of any shape, which was what the icons of that time did: Brigitte Bardot, Audrey Hepburn, Edie Sedgwick, Twiggy and others. By the way, not only the arrows, but also the eyelashes of the latter inspired artists and cosmetic companies. In 1967, Yardley released a set of Twiggy Lashes and Twiggy Eyepaint to give every woman the opportunity to replicate the look of a supermodel.

Liquid eyeliner dictated its own rules, the accent in the makeup was done on the eyes, summed up in blue, white or black. The fashion for defiant shooters also permeated the catwalks, where designers like Mary Quant experimented not only with clothes (the first miniskirts, short shorts), but also with the make-up of models.

Roll-On Deodorants

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The first aluminum chloride deodorants appeared in the 1900s and came in the form of a cream or liquid, and took time and attention to apply. Ban Roll-On was designed by Helen Barnett Dizerens, who was inspired by ballpoint pen technology. The plastic ball quickly and evenly distributed the liquid over the skin and, according to the advertisement, the roll-on deodorant was more comfortable and also more effective at protecting against sweat and odor than its predecessors.

The idea worked, among other things, thanks to the efforts of advertisers, who aggressively promoted deodorant creams and sprays since the beginning of the twentieth century. Historically, people disguised the unpleasant smell of sweat with perfume and colognes, and they were fine with it. The pioneering copywriters had to literally hype the problem out of sweating on a catastrophic scale. Through aggressive ads for deodorants, women have learned that everyone around them is discussing "this awful smell," and the first rule of seduction is a strong deodorant. By the way, men also got it: in the 1930s, advertising for men's deodorants frightened them with the possibility of being fired from work because of an unpleasant smell, and during the years of the Great Depression, such a statement had weight.

As such, roll-on deodorants were already being marketed around the world by the late 1960s, not just because of the innovative applicator. However, classic TV ads for Ban Roll-On from the early 1970s featured both women and men, and the company has yet to categorize its deodorants by gender. At the same time, advertising in magazines was still targeted at women - their main audience.

Brushes

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Until the mid-19th century, makeup brushes were used mainly by the maids of wealthy ladies to apply cosmetics to their mistresses. And although many of the wealthy women knew how and loved to paint, they still preferred not to do it on their own. The situation was corrected by the invention of the technology of mass production of mirrors in 1835 in Germany. Mirrors began to appear in every home, women were able to paint without assistance, and along the way Germany became one of the main centers for the production of brushes.

Later, Japanese manufacturers entered the market, who invested in the creation of makeup tools all their centuries of experience in the production of brushes. They were used in calligraphy and make-up in kabuki theater, hence the name of one of the most popular and convenient cosmetic brushes.

The design of Japanese brushes is another story. For example, the brushes of the Japanese company Kashoen 1883 are like works of art and are worth collecting. For 133 years of its existence, the company, preserving the ancient traditions of the production of brushes, has become a partner of Western cosmetic giants such as Chanel, Guerlain, Origins, Max Factor, Revlon, Elizabeth Arden, Estée Lauder. Most interesting is the powder brush, the handle of which is varnished using the same technology as the bowl used to crown the current emperor of Japan, Akihito.

Matting napkins

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The history of matting face wipes, or aburatorigami, began in 1610 in Japan. Originally intended for wrapping the finest decorative gold, this paper became popular among kabuki actors in the 17th century. Thanks to aburatorigami, actors could easily remove excess sebum and sweat from their faces without risking damage to the thick layer of makeup. Soon this find was taken over by geisha. Using matting paper, they prepared the skin for traditional makeup, and also used it to return a matte finish between hours of reception.

For modern women, the preservation of makeup is just as important as for geishas, ​​so the functions of matting wipes have not changed dramatically since their inception. They are still designed to take away unwanted shine while leaving the tone in place. Napkins of our time differ from traditional paper by aburatorigami in packaging and a variety of impregnation compositions, but there are brands that adhere to authenticity in production.

Note: Based on the sheer number of reviews on makeupalley.com (131 reviews and 4.8 out of 5), one of the most popular matting wipes is the regular Starbucks wipes.

Beautyblender

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The world's first drop-shaped reusable sponge hit the market in 2007 and made life easier for makeup artists forever, proving that it doesn't take years of practice and an airbrush to create a flawless tone. All the "magic" comes down to simple actions: wet, squeeze, apply and get the perfect face.

Its creator, makeup artist with 25 years of experience, Rea Ann Silva, says that she had no idea that a multimillion-dollar empire would grow out of her idea. She was just annoyed by the traditional triangular-shaped disposable sponges. But Beautyblender became the real salvation for the cinema, in which the high standards of HD won the final victory. The makeup for the shoot had to be invisible and flawless at the same time, while remaining intact for as long as possible. Beautyblender seems to have been specially created in order to cope with this task.

In just a few years, the name of the brand has become a household name, and now in every second video tutorial on makeup, you can see beauties of different colors and sizes: a drop-shaped sponge has replaced all brushes and is good for a variety of makeup products and techniques.

Cloth masks

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Serum-impregnated masks were created in South Korea and quickly gained worldwide acceptance. It takes 10-20 minutes to make yourself a face from the cover of Vogue. The dream that there is a bag with a solution to any problem has come true.

The manufacturers of masks surprise not only with the formulas in which you can find snake venom, pearls and snail extract that is already understandable to many, but also with forms: lace, hydrogel, in the form of animals, glowing in the dark. There are masks for lips, hair ends, nails, elbows and feet - you can wrap up from head to toe. This is what Lady Gaga, Lena Dunham, James Franco, Chris Pratt, Mindy Kaling and many other celebrities demonstrate in their instagram. The next step is a juicer, which will turn any vegetable or fruit into a hydrogel face mask in a matter of seconds.

Cushion

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IOPE Air Cushion was first introduced in 2008 by South Korean cosmetics giant AmorePacific. Initially, it was conceived as a universal remedy (tone, care and protection from the sun), located inside a porous pad, from which the cream squeezed out when pressed. The pad was housed in a classic powder box with a mirror and sponge, which is easy to carry and adjust your makeup throughout the day. This fundamentally distinguished the cushion from the usual tubes and cans with foundations. IOPE attracted attention not only with their revolutionary packaging, but also with their advertising of their cushions. They set up an unprecedented experiment in which a model in total weightlessness in 30 seconds managed to apply the perfect tone to itself with the Air Cushion.

Predictable cushion mania quickly took over the world, and soon many Asian and Western brands adopted this technology, releasing not only tonal cushions, but also concealers, blush, lip glosses, lipsticks, eyeshadows, eyeliners and even loose powders - all with pads.

Lisa Eldridge, the current creative director of Lancôme, is especially fond of cushions. Thanks to her, one of the main cosmetic novelties of this summer was born - the Juicy Shaker lip gloss. The masterpiece of cosmetic packaging looks like a miniature cocktail shaker filled with vibrant biphasic shine, and the cushion brush adds a lot of fun to the application process.

Photos: olya6105 - stock.adobe.com, Alvarra Crazy - stock.adobe.com, boomerang11 - stock.adobe.com, AlenKadr - stock.adobe.com, Nikita Zabellevich - stock.adobe.com, saknakorn - stock.adobe.com, Dayla, The Face Shop, Lancôme, Pudra, Muji

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