Perfume Critic Ksenia Golovanova On Cosmetics And Fragrances

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Perfume Critic Ksenia Golovanova On Cosmetics And Fragrances
Perfume Critic Ksenia Golovanova On Cosmetics And Fragrances

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Video: FAVOURITE PERFUME NOTES AND MATCHING SCENTS! (OBSESSED) 2022, November
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For the heading "Available" we study the contents of beauty cases, dressing tables and cosmetic cases of the characters we are interested in - and show all this to you.

Ksenia Golovanova

PERFUME CRITIC

Everything that helps to find oneself seems beautiful to me

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About beauty and norm

Ray Bradbury has a story “Tomorrow’s Child”, it was translated into Russian as “And yet ours…”. The plot is as follows: in the near future, an ordinary married couple has their first child - a blue pyramid with three eyes and six small tentacles. The child is warm, crying, he also needs to change the diapers, only they are triangular and he himself is triangular. It turns out that the baby was born in another dimension and there is no way to return him to our time-space. From the phase of rejection ("freak", "monster"), parents come to acceptance and love: realizing that their son cannot be pulled into a "normal" life, they themselves go to his dimension, and since then all people on our side of being see them as a white cylinder and a white tetrahedron. The metaphor here is obvious, but, as it seems to me, very important for our time: in a world where there are so many different people and cultures, there can be no one point of view on the normal and the beautiful. The fact that in your universe (and everyone has their own) seems stupid and wrong to you, in someone's microcosm it is a norm and even a standard.

But the most difficult thing is to accept not another person, but yourself. I reflected on this topic quite late: I had a fairly calm transitional age, without acne, but with a bunch of activities and travels that distracted from teenage thoughts about appearance. And it covered during pregnancy, when stretch marks appeared on the stomach and on the hips - not touching white stripes, but deep, purple and painful scars, with which nothing really could be done: over time they brightened and lost sensitivity, but still, very noticeable, of course. I was terribly complex - the reflection in the mirror, which changed almost overnight, upset me to tears, and there was no trace of the popular Internet campaigns that help newly-born women feel more confident and beautiful then. In addition, whenever I undressed in the doctor's office, regardless of specialization, he considered it his duty to say something like: "Wow, these are stretch marks, gee."

My future husband helped me to look at the situation from a different angle - from the world of the blue pyramid. Seeing me for the first time without clothes (and I, by the way, was terribly afraid of this moment), he said: "You should not be ashamed of your stretch marks, they are very beautiful - like stripes on a tiger's skin or ritual scars on an African queen." He saw the beauty in what I thought was ugliness, and when we were on our honeymoon, I went to the beach in an open swimsuit for the first time in a long time.

A few years ago, an event happened that determined a lot in my life: my son was diagnosed with autism. Accepting a diagnosis like that one about the blue pyramid is not easy, but in the end it helps you to reevaluate important things, in particular, accepted ideas about the norm. If today I read in an interview with a plastic surgeon that my type of smile - in which the gums are visible - is a defect that requires correction with Botox, I find it funny. When I smile and laugh, I see not so much the gums - the tonsils and, probably, part of the esophagus, but it's me, what's wrong with that? In general, it seems beautiful to me everything that helps you find yourself, get closer to your inner image of yourself: piercings, strange tattoos, blue eyebrows, pink hair, a beard down to your knees - whatever. Except for a huge built-up "jacket" - it's not nice for me here, I can't do anything with myself.

About leaving

I have sensitive skin, prone to rosacea and rosacea, which reacts to just about everything, and layering one remedy on top of another, as Korean women do, is my personal dermatological nightmare. I am a forced minimalist, whose daily routine boils down to a few proven products: Lush gentle cleanser, alcohol-free flower water (it replaces my toner) and a good BB cream that moisturizes, masks redness and protects from the sun.

Most of all, I probably take care of my hair. I have not dyed them for more than ten years - I like my natural natural color, especially after some time ago I did not quite successfully “went” to blondes. Once a week I make masks, every day I put oil on the ends - now it's Oribe, before it was a simple coconut from Thailand. Once a year I undergo a course of ten scalp pharmacopuncture procedures - injections with a cocktail of vitamins, microelements and other nutrients. This is the only thing that helped me to restore my hair after pregnancy, when I realized that the normal postpartum "shedding" was considerably delayed and became rampant. In salons, I am regularly asked to do something with my hair, for example, keratin straightening or lamination - from the point of view of some masters, they are too fluffy and not straight enough, but I like everything.

About makeup

I started to get interested in makeup not so long ago, and this is connected with two events. The first - unpleasant: rosacea worsened and I needed a "disguise" - so in the thirtieth year I discovered BB cream. The second is friendship with the guys from the beauty blog Fierce and Cute, the only one that I regularly read. They helped me look at makeup from an unusual point of view - as a way to tell a story, introduced me to progressive brands like NYX and generally breathed new life into my cosmetic bag. There, for example, green lipstick and the first make-up brush started up, and although I obviously won't become a make-up artist, the process of getting ready in the morning became more interesting. True, I still do not paint my eyes at all, I just “style” my eyebrows with a transparent MAC or Smashbox gel and adjust the shape - if you give my eyebrows free rein, they will grow together on the bridge of the nose, like Frida Kahlo's, form sideburns and will probably meet on the chin in the form a thick beard.

About smells

I have always been a "sniffer": I have a good sense of smell and best of all my memory captures not pictures or sounds, but smells. From my first business trip - to Shanghai - I remember most clearly the smell of the embankment: the river, braziers in the surrounding temples, food carts - and the same story repeated itself on subsequent trips. Smells became for me a way of taking inventory of reality, and I wanted to start understanding them - not on the "like / dislike" principle, but systematically.

The path was a little crooked: a few years ago I graduated from sommelier school, and although I did not work a day by profession and did not become a wine snob, I learned to distinguish well the shades of aromas - they seemed to have acquired a cut. Then she began to read and take notes, as a student, scientific articles and books on aroma chemistry, the psychology of smell perception and the history of perfumery. I read perfume blogs in all languages ​​that I speak. I have collected at home a huge collection of natural and synthetic substances that are used in perfumery - to learn how to recognize individual notes in complex compositions. I went to seminars, got acquainted and try to keep in touch with many perfumers - in short, this is a wildly fascinating process, similar to washing gold ore: there is no special place where you can come and become a perfume critic. It's worth it - once my friends turned to me for perfume advice, and now more and more strangers who have read my texts write: they ask me to help them choose a fragrance for a wedding or graduation daughter, pick up a gift for a husband or wife, etc. rewarding work.

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