Science And Life: Why Do We Get Seasick In Transport?

A life 2022
Science And Life: Why Do We Get Seasick In Transport?
Science And Life: Why Do We Get Seasick In Transport?

Video: Science And Life: Why Do We Get Seasick In Transport?

Video: The mystery of motion sickness - Rose Eveleth 2022, December
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SCIENTIFIC DATA EXIST NOT ONLY IN THE SPHERE OF THEORY: many of them are quite capable of improving our life, or at least explaining how it works. Today we are figuring out why we feel bad in moving transport.

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The cause of motion sickness may be a failure

in our brain that thinks we've been poisoned

Many people have experienced motion sickness in transport: you feel good, but as soon as you get into a car and it moves from its place, or an airplane seat - and it takes off, you immediately start to feel sick. Dr. Dean Burnett of Cardiff University, in his book "The Idiot Brain", talks about the most common theory that explains why we get sick in transportation. The cause of motion sickness may be a malfunction in our brain, which thinks we have been poisoned.

During evolution, the human brain has adapted to several types of movement - walking and running - with which certain neurological processes are associated. According to Burnett, mechanical transport has been around for a relatively short time, so our brains have not had time to develop mechanisms to recognize that we are moving in space. When traveling by car or plane, there are no signs of movement that are usual for us (muscles are calm, we sit, and our vision is limited by the space of the car, so we see only part of the world around us), while the brain receives conflicting signals - the vestibular apparatus shows that we are all - so we are moving. Then the brain finds the only possible explanation: we were poisoned, and nausea is the fastest way to cope with the poisoning.

There are other theories as well. For example, professor of kinesiology Thomas Stoffregen believes that we feel bad because we lose our balance. In addition, the scientists note that the risk of motion sickness is higher in an unmanned vehicle, mainly because passengers are more likely to go about their business, rather than watch the road.

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