What To Read In The Fall: 10 Exciting New Novels

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What To Read In The Fall: 10 Exciting New Novels
What To Read In The Fall: 10 Exciting New Novels

Video: What To Read In The Fall: 10 Exciting New Novels

Video: books you need to read this fall! *cozy book recommendations* 2022, November
Anonim

Text: Alexandra Bazhenova-Sorokina

Autumn has always been associated with books. Either it’s an ineradicable habit of starting a “new school year,” or book fairs are encouraging, but starting in September one just wants to take on a new book. This season is full of great news, from Jonathan Franzen's new novel of hope in American prose to the acclaimed Time Noise by Julian Barnes.

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Sinlessness

Jonathan Franzen

The new book of the main hope and support of the modern American novel by Jonathan Franzen has been translated into Russian as Sinlessness, although the name of the main character Purity is, of course, Purity. The distinction is important because, for the first time in Franzen's novel, it is not American modern history that is explored, but feelings that are understandable anywhere in the world. At the same time, his heroes are by no means sinless, but they have what can be called purity. "Sinlessness" is the fifth novel of the writer, in which he no longer needs to prove to anyone either his skill or his sense of humor. All this makes his new book more free, and the relationship between author and reader more friendly.

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Bella's glimpse

Boris Messerer

A theater artist and set designer, a student of Deineka, Boris Messerer could have written an interesting autobiography himself, but he decided to talk not about himself, but about his wife, Bella Akhmadulina. It is an infrequent, and therefore even more significant, case when a man decides to write about a great wife and about his relationship with her. Any documentary evidence of a woman-era today is worth its weight in gold, and here they are in full. Messerer published transcripts of Bella's conversations and monologues, which he devotedly collected and recorded on paper. Bella's Glimpse tells about the Soviet Union, and about the cultural elite, and about the amazingly talented Akhmadulina who is unlike anyone else, and about a great long love, which in itself is incredibly valuable.

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Something else

Diane Keaton

Smart and ironic, Diane Keaton is literally one of the most influential comedic actresses of all time. Without her, it is impossible to imagine the classics of Woody Allen, as well as "The Godfather". The actress, director and screenwriter has already written two books, and the first, an autobiography of 2011, is published for the first time in Russian. Diane Keaton remains true to herself, so her memoirs are unlike many others released by actors in recent years. First, Keaton doesn't try to be either too funny or too sad. Secondly, her book is in many ways a tribute to the memory of her mother, a failed actress, amateur photographer, who saw a special power in the art of collage. Such a collage is offered to readers by the star "Annie Hall". Between celebrity stories, candid descriptions of her struggles with bulimia, and reflections on her parents, she creates a life story that is impossible not to respect.

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History of the siege of Lisbon

Jose Saramago

How can a person influence history? For example, to put the particle “not” in the historical description in such a way that the historical text irreversibly changes and asserts what was not in reality. The life of the proofreader, who delivered the ill-fated particle, unfolds thanks to the unexpected proposal that followed. Saramago's 1989 novel is both a reflection on the creation and work on the text, and a historical novel about the siege of Lisbon and the Portuguese reconquista. The Portuguese classic maneuvers between a fictional story and the sad everyday life of a proofreader, between the past and the present, and latently reflects on the main Portuguese magician of the word Fernando Pessoa, whose book "Sea Ode" will also be published in Russian for the first time this fall.

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The noise of time

Julian Barnes

Julian Barnes is one of the most important English-speaking writers of our time, and each of his books is news, especially since the author of "A History of the World in Ten and a Half Chapters" and "Premonitions of the End" does not repeat himself and every time writes about a new and new way. Barnes took the title "The Noise of Time" from the book of memoirs by Osip Mandelstam in order to tell about the equally significant, but less heroic artist of the Soviet era - Dmitry Shostakovich. In three episodes from the life of the great composer against the background of various events in the USSR, Barnes fits both the era and the country, but, most importantly, the universal problem of the creator: to be a hero or to create. For a Russian reader, the novel of 2016 can cause rejection, because no one likes it when someone tells you about yours from the outside. However, it is important to understand that Barnes is a great writer, not a historian or a politician, and is not going to teach the reader a lesson.

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Seven years in Tibet

Heinrich Harrer

The role of Heinrich Harrer in the film of the same name by Jean-Jacques Annaud became one of the key roles in the career of the young Brad Pitt. At the same time, the international bestseller of 1952, on which the film was filmed, oddly enough, is only now being released in Russian for the first time. "Seven Years in Tibet" is an autobiographical travel guide of an Austrian who escaped with a friend from an English camp in India. He moves across the Himalayas to discover another world in Tibet and become a mentor and friend of the XIV Dalai Lama. The story of a man who, by chance, did not become part of the Third Reich and fell in love with a parallel universe, which looks both like a fairy tale and like a dystopia.

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The economy of good and evil

Tomasz Sedlacek

Economist, economic consultant to President Vaclav Havel and lecturer at several universities in Prague, Tomáš Sedlacek understands economics both on a practical and theoretical level. His 2009 book The Economics of Good and Evil became a bestseller in the Czech Republic and, after being translated into English, throughout Europe. It is based on the rejected dissertation of Sedlacek, in which he argues that economics not only exists in the theoretical field, but also affects culture, the picture of the world and the life of different communities. The book's subtitle, In Search of the Meaning of Economics from Gilgamesh to Wall Street, speaks for itself. Sedlacek combines science with anthropology, cultural history, geography and world history to prove that only an economy with a human face can save us.

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Zombie Brain: A Scientific Approach to the Behavior of the Walking Dead

Timothy Verstinen, Bradley Wojtek

Two geek neuroscientists wrote a book about zombies, but in fact about the work of the brain. Verstinen and Wojtek talk about the relationship between its different parts and behavior, about what happens to the brain when a person sleeps, walks or is in different emotional states. Taking as examples everything that pop culture has given humanity to know about the walking dead, the authors tell us in a fun and easy way about ourselves, and so accurately and versatile that the book has already entered the must-read list in some university biology courses (at least least in the United States). The victory of nerds over the world has never been sweeter or funnier.

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When breath becomes air

Paul Kalaniti

Paul Kalaniti had his whole life ahead, and he calculated everything in it: career growth, family affairs. Having left the study of literature in his time, he became a doctor and deliberately chose the most complex specialization - neurosurgery. When he found out about the incurable diagnosis, he faced a difficult choice that could not but be made. Kalaniti died in 2015, but managed to hold his little daughter in his arms and left a book on how to live when there was little time left, but it is not known how much. In addition to the tragically urgent problem of experiencing fatal diagnoses, Kalaniti's book, despite the difficult and sometimes annoying moments (it is not very easy to read a person who is always confident in his own righteousness), is a great way to see the universal need to be able to live in the present.

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Area of ​​interest

Martin Amis

The fourteenth novel by Martin Amis is a satire in the spirit of Gogol-Shchedrin, a story of love and morality on the unexpected theme of the Holocaust.The writer took the place of action from his novel "The Arrow of Time" - this is part of the death camp Auschwitz, and the story is told by three heroes: the alcoholic commandant Paul Doll, his subordinate Angelus Thomsen, who develops a platonic romance with Doll's wife Hannah, and, finally, a Jew working in the camp, Shmul. One could compare "Zone of Interest" with Tarantino's "Inglourious Basterds", if Amis did not remain constantly devoted to a reality that does not let go even in the most comic moments. Perhaps this is why his book received significantly more unequivocal positive reviews.

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