Lumberjacks: Excerpt From A Girl Scout Adventure Comic

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Lumberjacks: Excerpt From A Girl Scout Adventure Comic
Lumberjacks: Excerpt From A Girl Scout Adventure Comic

Video: Lumberjacks: Excerpt From A Girl Scout Adventure Comic

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Dasha Tatarkova

Jellyfish Jam publishes the Lumberjacks comic - the story of the girls' adventures in the summer camp. It was invented by Noel Stevenson - the author of the hit "Nimona", as well as the ironic blog The Hawkeye Initiative, ridiculing sexism in comics - as well as Shannon Waters, Grace Ellis and Brooke A. Allen. Lumberjacks, as the publishers themselves say, combines the best we love about adventure stories with a touch of the supernatural like Gravity Falls or Adventure Time. It is better to see once than hear a hundred times, so here is an excerpt.

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Vasily Shevchenko

What incredible happiness it is to discover something new. The comic strip "Lumberjacks" tells about this, and it evokes exactly the same feelings in me. The initiative to purchase a license came from my colleagues. By that time I had not even had time to read Nimona, which glorified Noelle Stevenson, who wrote The Woodcutter. I got interested in all of this when Agent Stevenson sent us something like this: "Noel is bathed in glory, becoming the youngest author to hit the National Book Award longlisted, so pay us more money." We laughed, paid, and I finally sat down to read the comic itself.

With delight, I began to screech about the second page and did not stop until the end of the book. Stevenson works in the same field as Hirsch with Gravity Falls or Bill Waterson with Calvin and Hobbs - a childish sense that behind the facade of everyday life lies a fantastic world that awaits its explorer. Only here there are five of these researchers - and they are all girls. Different, but incredibly alive. They are infinitely far from the stereotypical images that comics were full of ten years ago. It's wildly cool that such works as "The Lumberjacks" can become a starting point for a bunch of readers who have previously seen only the dull facade of comics, having no idea how much is hidden behind it.

Images: Jellyfish Jam

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