Cinema Theater: 10 Films Based On Iconic Performances

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Cinema Theater: 10 Films Based On Iconic Performances
Cinema Theater: 10 Films Based On Iconic Performances

Video: Cinema Theater: 10 Films Based On Iconic Performances

Video: Top 10 Movies Based on Theatrical Plays 2022, November
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Kirill Serebrennikov's "Apprentice" comes out on screens - a drama that won the "Kinotavr" and was awarded the prize of the independent press in Cannes. The film tells the story of a young fanatic who went on a personal crusade against depravity and godlessness at school. The "Apprentice" is based on a play by Marius von Mayenburg, which Serebrennikov has already staged on the theater stage: the topical "(M) student" appeared in the repertoire of the Moscow "Gogol Center" two years ago. Translation from the language of the theater into the language of cinema is not such a rare thing: to be convinced of this, we recall ten more performances that gave rise to films and left their mark on history.

Tram "Desire"

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The classic 1951 four-Oscar black-and-white film would never have been made without a successful Broadway production. The play by Tennessee Williams, the foremost American playwright of all time, was first performed at New York's Schubert. The director of the play was Elia Kazan, the future director of the film version. The unearthly butterfly woman Blanche Dubois, who despises reality and dreams of magic, was played by Briton Jessica Tandy. Her son-in-law, the uncouth Stanley Kowalski, rapist and drunkard, is a young, then unknown Marlon Brando. Almost the entire cast of the original play starred in the film adaptation. One of those who refused to repeat her character in the movie was Tandy - as a result, the role of Blanche was given to the great Viwen Lee.

Romeo and Juliet

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1968, dir. Franco Zeffirelli

For the first time tackling the textbook tragedy in 1960, Franco Zeffirelli tried to free her from clichés. Instead of the usual high-flown lyrics, the audience saw a full-blooded life: at the very first minute of the performance, a motley street crowd tumbled onto the stage, and Romeo and Juliet themselves were awkward, funny, terribly spontaneous teenagers. Two versions of the production existed in Britain and in the director's homeland, Italy; in the London version, Juliet was played by a young Judi Dench.

The English-language film, shot in hot pursuit, won two Oscars and three Golden Globes. Zeffirelli ventured to invite very young performers for the main roles - Leonard Whiting and Olivia Hussey, whom this film instantly made stars. Conservative critics were stunned by the bed scene, which in the 60s looked like utter insolence in relation to Shakespeare. The musical theme of Nino Rota, written for the theatrical version, which has migrated to the cinema, will compete in popularity with his own soundtrack to The Godfather.

Funny girl

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1968, dir. William Wyler

Film versions of Broadway musicals are a separate Hollywood tradition with a rich history. In 1964, Jules Stein and Bob Merrill's Funny Girl appeared on the Winter Garden stage: the authors romanticized early 20th century Broadway, retelling the biography of Fanny Bryce, the star of the legendary Siegfeld Folly show, in their own way. Fanny, a witty and resourceful girl from the outskirts, stubbornly makes her way onto the stage, trying to ignore the remarks of good acquaintances about her “non-classical” appearance. One day, behind the scenes, she meets the charming but windy gambler Nikki Arnstein. The screen version of the Broadway hit was released in 1968. As in the theatrical version, Fanny was played by Barbra Streisand, who perfectly fit into the character. The debut in the cinema brought the singer and actress the first Oscar.

Jesus Christ Superstar

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The still-criticized rock opera by Andrew Lloyd Webber (music) and Tim Rice (libretto) hit Broadway in 1971, the year after the album's release.The authors of the scandalous musical portrayed Christ as a mortal man, not completely sure of his mission, and the traitor Judas, his only reflective follower. Jeff Fenholt and Ben Werin, the first soloists to perform the roles of Jesus and Judas on stage, were sometimes replaced by Ted Neely and Karl Anderson, the stars of the future film adaptation.

The film version was directed by Norman Juison, filmed in the Israeli desert; visually, it looks like an illustration for a children's Bible, to which the bully-reader, giggling, added modern details. Jesus smashes the stands with postcards in the Jerusalem Temple, the Romans drive around in tanks, and King Herod sunbathes by the pool in swimming trunks. However, these are not even anachronisms: as follows from the prologue, the characters in the film are not inhabitants of the ancient world, but hippie actors traveling in the sands.

Demons

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The censorship of socialist Poland miraculously missed Andrzej Wajda's "Demons": Dostoevsky's novel, exposing revolutionary circles, took the ruling party away from the line in a very wrong direction. "Death Run" - this is how the classic of Polish directing called the state of Dostoevsky's heroes. Striving for the feeling of running, movement, he put the heroes not on a flat floor, but on a muddy dirt road. Furniture and props were changed by eerie faceless assistants in black (these characters Vaida found in a Japanese puppet theater), who by the end began to rudely interfere with the action.

"The Demons" was released at the Krakow Old Theater in 1971, and since then the director has returned to the novel more than once. One such comeback is a 1988 French film starring movie stars Isabelle Huppert and Omar Sharif. Everything that is not directly related to terrorists-"demons", the script leaves out of brackets: the film adaptation of Wajda is focused on the underground radicals and their specific psychology.

Mahabharata

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1989, dir. Peter Brook

Patrons of the Avignon Theater Festival in 1985 were ready to spend the night in a cold, abandoned quarry for the sake of Peter Brook's Mahabharata: the performance ran under the July night sky from evening to morning. The action took place against the backdrop of steep stone slopes - a ready-made decoration suitable for any era, any culture. To throw off the shackles of the national tradition, to create a work that is understandable to the whole world - these were the tasks the director set himself. To emphasize the universality of the ancient Indian epic, its universal meaning, Brook distributed roles between actors of different ethnic origins.

Four years after his Avignon triumph, Brooke recruited the same artists in a six-hour miniseries, and then remade it into a three-hour film. The camera allowed the director what the scene could not provide: more natural landscapes, a greater scope of battle episodes, a more convex portrayal of individual characters. For us, this is also a great opportunity to understand once and for all that there the Kauravas did not share with their cousins, the Pandavas.

Another side of the moon

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2003, dir. Robert Lepage

Canadian Robert Lepage is a versatile artist: he makes films, directs operas, dramas and shows for Cirque du Soleil, writes scripts and plays, plays on stage and in films - and he does it all perfectly. In the one-man show "The Other Side of the Moon", he acted as an author, director and actor. The protagonist is a space-obsessed, touching loser teacher Philip. He shoots a documentary about humanity for extraterrestrial civilizations and dreams of meeting the Soviet cosmonaut Alexei Leonov.

In the course of the action, Philippe-Lepage was reincarnated as a brother-TV presenter, a deceased mother, a doctor; filled everyday things with unexpected meaning - like a washing machine that turned into an aircraft; "Floated" on the floor, imitating a person in zero gravity (and the audience watched the miracle of flight in a mirror hanging above the stage).The film version has retained many witty metaphors - primarily due to editing: in the adjacent frames, the director shows a fetus in the womb and an astronaut connected to the ship with an umbilical cord. The rival brothers Philip and Andre, the Canadian dreamer again played himself.

Portraying the victim

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2006, dir. Kirill Serebrennikov

In 2004, exactly for the release of the play based on the play by the Presnyakov brothers, the Moscow Art Theater named after Chekhov dropped the abbreviation "A", that is, "academic". The change of the sign played the role of a manifesto: enough, they say, to sit in an airtight gilded box, we will look for a new language to describe the new reality. The face of the “non-academic” Moscow Art Theater was director Kirill Serebrennikov, an angry young self-taught person from Rostov-on-Don.

The protagonist of his production "Portraying the Victim", Valya, portrayed the victims in investigative experiments, not missing an opportunity to mock - for him the violence was losing reality, it happened as if for fun. In essence, the play spoke of indifference as the leading trait of Generation X, which was reflected in the style of directing: the terrible, bloody looked funny and grotesque. Two years later, Serebrennikov directed a film based on the play. The film adaptation was remembered for the inimitable obscene monologue of Vitaly Khaev, the police captain, addressed to the generation of the then 30-year-olds, the brilliant episode of Leah Akhedzhakova and the catch phrase “Russian cinema in the ass”.

Loving son of Frankenstein

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Frightening by the naturalistic lumpen life, the performance "Project Frankenstein" by the Hungarian provocateur Kornel Mundruzzo was a very free presentation of Mary Shelley's "Frankenstein". The owners of the poverty-stricken apartment, typical inhabitants of the social bottom, rent out their housing to a film director with a nonrandom surname Victor. The tenant conducts the casting, weeding out one applicant after another. The candidate getting the role is actually his sociopathic son who escaped from the orphanage; a kind of reincarnation of the Frankenstein monster. In 2010, three years after the theatrical premiere, Mundrutso directed an ascetic arthouse drama, where he played Victor (that is, Frankenstein). The painting fought for the Golden Palm. The characters "moved" to an abandoned, once beautiful, but now crumbling mansion of the times of the Austro-Hungarian Empire: according to the director, the dilapidated building is associated with Hungary.

Delhi dance

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Seven short stories - seven alternative situations in one hospital ward. Star playwright Ivan Vyrypaev wrote The Dance of Delhi for the eminent Warsaw Narodov Theater and staged it himself in 2010. In the minimalistic performance, virtuoso philosophical dialogues about creativity, compassion and attitude to evil came to the fore. All seven stories revolve around a famous dancer who once conceived her masterpiece in a dirty and impoverished market in Delhi: other characters see her dance as an expression of all the world's pain. No one dances in the Polish production or in the later Russian film - Vyrypaev relies on the imagination of the viewer. In the film adaptation, theatrical intimacy remained: a small cast, one location for the whole picture. Apart from the Vyrypaev's text, this spoken movie is “made” by amazingly lively, reliable actors - Karolina Grushka, Igor Gordin, Ksenia Kutepova and others. Intellectual arguments in their performance are completely devoid of dryness and boredom.

Photos: Warner Bros., BHE Films, Columbia Pictures, Universal Pictures, Gaumont, MP Productions, FCL Films, New People, Essential Filmproduktion, Film Address

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