Young Women Writers Worth Reading Right Now

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Young Women Writers Worth Reading Right Now
Young Women Writers Worth Reading Right Now

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Become a writer and establish yourself in the profession, to make sure that you are noticed and remembered is no less difficult than to light up in Hollywood. Meanwhile, each new generation of readers needs contemporary authors who shared their childhood with them and understand their concerns and problems. Therefore, we have selected ten of the most promising writers whom we hope to read for more than a decade.

Eleanor Cutton

Eleanor Cutton is a New Zealander who openly criticizes the governments of Australia and her homeland, which respond to her with mutual hatred. Catton finished her first novel, The Rehearsal, at the age of 22. The story of the high school scandal, unclear if real or fictional, made Catton a critics' favorite and gave her the opportunity to work on her next piece without thinking about the money. The result is the thickest book in the history of the Booker laureates, a metaromaniac pretending to be stylization, Luminaries. The best-selling 19th-century New Zealand gold rush book spiced with murder, sex, opium, and astrology is one of the best books of the 21st century. Catton is only 30, and she will definitely show everyone else.

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Marianna Ionova

A philologist and literary critic, writing for the magazines Novy Mir and Aren, Marianna Ionova by her 30s has published two books, as well as many short works. In 2011, she became a laureate of the Debut Prize, and in 2013 she entered the long list of the Bunin Prize. The collections "Marilyn" and "St. Patrick's Day" are good with subtle, clever stories that you want to read deeply - about love, about relationships, about thoughts and dreams that are interspersed with reality, and, what is especially nice, about Moscow. Although Ionova has long been publishing only prose, it is imperative to pay attention to collections: her stories are intimate and written in the style of a poet, devoid of vulgarity or deliberate romance.

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Chania Yanagihara

The second novel of Hawaiian American Hanya Yanagihara, "A Little Life", will soon be published in Russian and has become one of the most important literary events of 2015. The story of four ambitious and talented friends who conquer New York is intertwined with the personal story of one of them - the future lawyer and mathematician Jude, who for many years experienced violence from the priests who raised him. Yanagihara's hefty book constantly balances between describing bullying on the one hand and the joys of life and friendship on the other.

The writer touched upon the topic of child abuse in her first novel, People Living in Trees. Critics were deeply impressed: Yanagihara shows him not as something extraordinary, but as a frighteningly common part of life. Her heroes are people who have to cope with the damage done in a world where religion has long ceased to bring relief.

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Zadie Smith

Zadie Smith became one of the stars of modern literature after she published her first novel, White Teeth, at the age of 24. The writer's debut about immigrants from Jamaica and Bangladesh, about Jehovah's Witnesses and with many intertwining plots, was written in such an adult way, with such an ability to tell stories that Smith was persistently compared to Salman Rushdie. Since then, the Englishwoman has released four more novels and several collections of short stories, collected many literary awards, together with her husband Nick Laird, she worked on the script for Claire Denis's new film - she certainly will not stop there. Although Smith is no longer a debutante, there is confidence that the creative flowering of the writer is still ahead.

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Guzel Yakhina

Guzeli Yakhina did not immediately manage to publish her debut novel "Zuleikha Opens Her Eyes" - publishing houses did not accept the manuscript even after the excerpt was published in the Siberian Nights magazine.However, thanks to the literary agency, the text was eventually published by the publishing house "AST" and became a sensation and a finalist for the "Big Book - 2015" award. The novel about the life of the dispossessed Tatar woman Zuleikha is a book about the Soviet terror, and about the life of the Tatar village, and about the inner world of a woman and her awakening to life. Yakhina was born in Kazan and talks about the Tatar world firsthand, and at the end of the book gives a small Tatar-Russian dictionary, which makes it even more valuable. The writer has released several more stories, and, most likely, this is only the beginning of her journey.

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Emma Klein

Emma Klein's first novel in 2016 has already made a splash: despite the fact that critics note the wonderful style and love for detail, many people do not understand why the author chose extremely dubious historical circumstances for the novel about growing up. Those Girls is a tale of a dark cult of the late 1960s, inspired by the history of Charles Manson's Family commune. Evie, an inconspicuous teenager from California, meets Suzanne and other girls living in the family of a certain Russell, who will soon go to a bloody massacre. Roman Klein is not a look at the sect of the 60s and 60s as such. This is the story of the heroine's growing up, consisting of observations about daily experience, of admiration for the newness of life, mixed with complex reflections on why it is so important for a girl to be noticed by someone in order to understand something about herself.

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Sheila Heti

At 39, Canadian Sheila Heti is already a literary veteran. The author of stories, novels and non-fiction, like Svetlana Aleksievich, pays no less attention to the voices of others than to his own. In addition to her debut collection "Middle Stories" and the novel "Ticknor", she published a book based on conversations and correspondence with her friends from the art environment of Toronto "What a Man Should Be", in which the documentary is mixed with the fictional. The writer cares about art and beautiful dresses, sex and food, beauty and ugliness, and in each new text she manages to combine reality and fiction in order to ask key questions of life in a new way. Kheti’s novel All Our Happy Days Are Stupid has just been released, and it’s obvious that she’s not going to stop.

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Celeste Ing

Celeste Ing, a Chinese American, is the daughter of scientists who emigrated to the United States from Hong Kong in the 1960s. She, like no one else, understands the problems of integration, self-determination and the crisis of identity inherent in the families of immigrants. It was about them that she wrote in the book pretending to be a thriller "Everything I Never Told You About." The story of the disappearance of a clever and excellent student from a family of Chinese immigrants in a small town begins as a detective story, but gradually develops into the history of a social phenomenon that every year becomes familiar to more and more people: survival in a world that does not accept you. In addition to her debut novel, Celeste has already published many short stories and is being published in literary magazines, and the novel brought her commercial success, becoming Amazon's Book of the Year in 2014.

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Katherine Lacey

Katherine Lacey's debut novel Nobody Ever Lost, a native of Tupelo in Mississippi, has been compared to the iconic US Cutter by Renata Adler and half a dozen stories about women on the verge of a nervous breakdown who decided to give up everything. The 2014 book is the stream of consciousness of the main character with the unusual name Elyria, who leaves New York, from her husband ten years older than her, from a family tragedy - her sister's suicide, but not only. Elyria deliberately runs from herself - hitchhiking around New Zealand. The charm and freshness of Lacey's novel gives the feeling that it was written not in order to talk about the social or internal problems of women, but for the sake of the heroine herself: close and incomprehensible, familiar and unpredictable, but most importantly - in her poetic observation, it does not look like a driven victim of circumstances, but on the modern beatnik.

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Alyssa Nutting

Alissa Nutting's Tampa became a stumbling block for critics and readers in 2013.It would seem that the story of a 26-year-old beauty teacher who seduces a 14-year-old boy resembles the movie "Scandalous Diary", but this is only at first glance. Nutting, who had published a collection of tragicomic stories "Filthy Work for Girls and Women," before her first novel, decided not to focus on the psychology of the nymphomaniac, or the boy's tragedy, or the environment in which the story unfolds. In her book, there is a sea of ​​sex and a sea of ​​senseless and merciless drive, which many critics thought was not enough for a swing to a new "Lolita". However, firstly, Nutting herself clearly sees herself as a new Palahniuk rather than Nabokov, and secondly, it seems that many are frightened not even by the banality of her heroine's evil, but by how much has been said about women's desires and about a woman as an enslaver, and not as a sacrifice.

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