Visiting A Fairy Tale: 10 Great Children's Films That Will Move Adults

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Visiting A Fairy Tale: 10 Great Children's Films That Will Move Adults
Visiting A Fairy Tale: 10 Great Children's Films That Will Move Adults

Video: Visiting A Fairy Tale: 10 Great Children's Films That Will Move Adults

Video: TOP 5: Fairy Tale Movies [live action] 2022, November
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With age, craving for magic and adventure goes into the category of nostalgic: it is for people prone to sentimentality that the adaptation of "Warcraft" is primarily designed, and it is they who stick to the tests "Who is your Patronus". This week, a spin-off of Harry Potter, "Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them," is released: an adaptation of the book of the same name by J.K. Rowling with a not-too-elegant translation of the title. It’s hard to say who this release excited more: today's teens or those who were children during the early Potters. We recall our favorite fairy-tale stories, on which more than one generation has grown and which we want (or want to) review with our children. After all, the older we get, the more interesting it is to notice in our favorite films of childhood plots and meanings that were previously out of sight.

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Maze

Year: 1986

Producer: Jim Henson

Most of the films that we loved as children evoke somewhat (or completely) different feelings in adulthood. The problem is not in naive graphics or plots, the inconsistencies of which you begin to notice: it often turns out that this is a very scary or sad movie. For example, not only about friendship and adventure, but about loneliness or death. This is exactly the story with Labyrinth: a musical about how the goblin king (David Bowie in grotesque makeup and a wig) stole a baby brother from a girl (Jennifer Connelly) - both about the problem of responsibility and about the fear of growing up, reminiscent of blind wandering labyrinth. And all the stupid Jim Henson dolls dancing on the plush bumps of a conventional swamp cannot disguise it. Never before has the tale of the beauty and the beast, and with it the fantasy of a white dress at the ball, looked so ominous and doomed. Cry, cry, dance, dance. Not to mention, Bowie himself is gone.

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Alien

Year: 1982

Producer: Steven Spielberg

Plots about aliens seem to be something not very childish and rather promising horror, the abduction of bodies and the invasion of the Martian tripods. So, probably, many Russians born in the 80s were not allowed into the video salon by their parents, confusing "Alien" with "Alien" - but in vain. Steven Spielberg's classic film, like any great fiction, teaches humanism from an early age. The story of how a touching, big-eyed alien (albeit obviously on hinges and made of rubber) was sheltered by a company of children teaches the most basic skill: to understand another, even if he is not at all like you. The moral, it would seem, is hackneyed, but this makes it no less relevant: last summer, the same plot was brilliantly worked by the series "Stranger Things", having quoted Spielberg verbatim several times.

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Where the monsters live

Year: 2009

Producer: Spike Jonze

Spike Jonze's heartbreaking film based on the children's picture book of the same name, on which more than one generation of Americans grew up. The author of the original source is illustrator Maurice Sendak, and you need to know a little about his biography in order to understand why there is so much shrill escapism in the story of the boy's adventures in an imaginary country. Born into a family of Polish Jews, Sendak faced the Holocaust and faced death early, and in addition spent part of his childhood bedridden. It is not surprising that “Where the monsters live” came out as a parable that only fearlessness and honesty will make you king - even among the huge creatures that were actually going to eat you.

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The history of toys

Year: 1995

Producer: John Lasseter

Basically, this place could be any Pixar movie - either the early Monsters, Inc. or the recent Puzzle. Toy Story is the first in this series: the debut feature film of the legendary studio, which will later become the main cartoon for the whole family.The need to lure both children and adults to the cinema in the mid-90s was not yet so acute - but even without this adventure of a toy cowboy Woody can be watched and revisited at any age. And the reason is not only that it is "from childhood." The collective children's fantasy about the secret life of toys is just a facade of truly adult questions: is it true that love inevitably passes and your place will sooner or later be taken by someone more smart and newer? Are you a person or a toy after all?

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Endless story

Year: 1984

Producer: Wolfgang Petersen

The main blockbuster of Germany, a fantastic story about a schoolboy Bastion - lonely, unhappy and not understood by others. The boy's mother died, his father closed in on himself, classmates only tease and fight. It is not surprising that Bastion finds an outlet in his own fantasies and at some point plunges into the world of dreams so much that it merges with reality. "Infinite Story" was consistently shown on TV during the New Year holidays, so if your childhood was in the late 80s - early 90s, you will surely remember the magnificent Falcor - a giant dragon with a dog's head and the nonexistent country of Fantasy, which is in danger of extinction. The dark plot, combined with the dedication of the young heroes, will leave no chance for a quiet viewing - it doesn't matter whether you cry over the death of Artax's horse or grab your heart at the thought that, perhaps, only children can dream on such a large scale.

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The Wizard of Oz

Year: 1939

Producer: Victor Fleming

As they say, "timeless classics" based on the book by Lyman Frank Baum, published in 1900. The adventures of a brave girl from Kansas, who set an example for the Cowardly Lion, the Tin Woodman and the Scarecrow, had already been filmed three times by this time (including once without sound, and one as a nine-minute cartoon). But the version of the 39th year entered the gold fund, which was then played on TV for a long time, including the Russian one. I must say that a lot has happened here. And tiny 17-year-old vaudeville star Judy Garland with the ease and face of a girl from the next yard, and an outstanding soundtrack, and special effects, and an inventive use of techicolor: only scenes in Fairyland are filmed on color film. And, of course, an unfading cautionary tale that no kind wizard will save your life, and only you can become kinder, smarter and bolder (if you really think that you need it).

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Fantastic Mr. Fox

Year: 2009

producer: Wes Anderson

More than one fairy tale has been shot based on children's books by Briton Roald Dahl: among the most famous are Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, Matilda (about her below) and The Big and Kind Giant (this year's novelty, which Spielberg worked on). Dahl is famous for being able to present, under the guise of children's fairy tales, stories that were more intended for parents - gloomy, sarcastic, with questions that not every adult is ready to answer. In the film adaptation of Fantastic Mr. Fox, the main character - a cunning Fox with a criminal past - has to choose: remain a swindler or become a respectable family man. Is it permissible to risk the well-being of a wife and son in order to satisfy their passion for adventure, if without the latter, life is not a joy? Puppet animation and the characteristic light aesthetics of Wes Anderson, who transferred the book to the screen, smoothed out the uncompromising and harshness of Dale's intonation. But the classic dilemma - bourgeois stability or an adventurous future - did not get any easier, even though Fox makes his choice at the very beginning of the cartoon.

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Matilda

Year: 1996

Producer: Danny DeVito

"Matilda" is one of the best books by Roald Dahl, on which two generations of children have grown up, and the 1996 film adaptation is the case when the film turned out to be no worse than the book.The story of an unusually gifted and inquisitive girl with the ability to telekinesis touches upon quite adult problems with which people go to a psychotherapist for years: Matilda shows by her example that parents, no matter how terrible they are, do not determine your future, authority cannot be won by oppression those who are weaker, and the winner in the end is the one who is honest and respects the feelings of others. Matilda's main strength is not the supernatural abilities that manifest themselves in moments of anger (special thanks to Dahl for this example of productive female rage), but empathy and intelligence. After watching Matilda, children will no longer want to offend the nerds, and adults will feel the strength to stand up for themselves.

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Jumanji

Year: 1995

Producer: Joe Johnston

Jumanji has everything you need for success for all generations of viewers: a jungle in the living room, a mysterious board game, a touching story of childhood friendship that grows into love, and Robin Williams, young Kirsten Dunst and Bonnie Hunt forever alive in our hearts, who played in another great children's film - "Beethoven". If in childhood "Jumanji" may seem scary, for adults it is a completely harmless fairy tale with adventures and a good ending. Watching a cult children's film at a conscious age allows you to pay attention to curious minor characters - for example, the kind aunt who takes care of orphans, and to appreciate her jokes about bourbon and psychotherapeutic audio courses.

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Princess bride

Year: 1987

Producer: Rob Reiner

An iconic tale by American writer William Goldman, filmed by Rob Reiner, the man who directed such dissimilar films as Spinal Tap and When Harry Met Sally. In "The Princess Bride", if you wish, you can find something from both: here and exciting adventures with the right dose of absurdity, and a romantic story, from which the heart aches equally for adults and children. Buttercup girl - the film debut of Robin Wright, who had just gotten even with "Santa Barbara" - after her lover disappears into the sea, agrees to marry Prince Humperdinck, but before the wedding she is kidnapped. Not only the betrothed, but also the mysterious pursuer in the mask, with whom Dandelion has much more in common than she realizes, gets involved in the pursuit. “The Princess Bride”, contrary to its patriarchal name, has not in vain earned world love - this movie exemplarily treats the cliche of a girl in trouble, teaching an example of female strength, not weakness.

Photos: Delph V Productions, Universal Pictures, Warner Bros., Pixar Animation Studios, Neue Constantin Film, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM), Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation, TriStar Pictures, TriStar Pictures, Act III Communications

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