How I Bought A Motorcycle And Drove The Coast Of Canada In A Week

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How I Bought A Motorcycle And Drove The Coast Of Canada In A Week
How I Bought A Motorcycle And Drove The Coast Of Canada In A Week

Video: How I Bought A Motorcycle And Drove The Coast Of Canada In A Week

Video: COMMON MISTAKES on a LONG MOTORCYCLE TRIP (do you make them?) 2022, December
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MY NAME IS EMILY CAMPBELL, I'm twenty-five and I work as a radio morning news reporter. I grew up in Calgary, a long way from here, but have been living in Montreal for six years. In parallel with my work, I study at the university. This year I bought my first motorcycle, a 1983 Honda Nighthawk 450; it's older than me, it cost a thousand Canadian dollars - an old clunker, but it rides just fine. I was lucky with him: for nine years he stood in some shed completely motionless, so his mileage is much lower than it could have been. I drove it all summer without problems, despite the fact that the roads in Montreal are terrible, everything is in holes.

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A few months after the purchase, in September my friend and I did a seven-day motorcycle ride along the east coast of Canada. Our trip began in Montreal, then we drove through Fredericton, St. Andrews, Halifax, Prince Edward Island, Quebec, Rimuski - and returned to Montreal exactly seven days later. Since I just got on a motorcycle, I wanted to understand what I was capable of - and, of course, to see that part of my vast country that I had never been to. The main thing in this journey for us was the road itself and the landscapes surrounding it, and not the cities that we passed. It was cold for us, a strong wind was blowing, but the landscapes were so breathtaking. We deliberately chose small roads and avoided highways, because it is safer and more beautiful that way. At the same time, we had several dangerous moments - for example, once an unsuccessfully reconstructed truck pushed me into the oncoming lane. Fortunately, no one was driving along it at that moment, but if there were someone there, it would be scary. A friend of mine has a classic 1976 Honda CB. He's already a very experienced motorcyclist, I don't know how to ride like him yet.

And when you travel on a motorcycle, you cannot take a lot of luggage with you - there is simply nowhere to put it. In this case, you must take all the necessary equipment with you. There is only room for spare jeans, T-shirts and underwear. On this trip I had two saddlebags, but by the end they were completely frayed, and we had to tie them with a rope.

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Montreal - Fredericton

We drove from Montreal to Fredericton. The first day was the hardest, we drove thirteen hours with very short stops to eat and refuel. That day I was tired as never in my life, and insisted that we do not arrange such long runs anymore - because it is simply hard to bear physically. After thirteen hours on a motorcycle, my whole body ached, because when you ride a motorcycle at a speed of 130 kilometers per hour on the highway, you fight the headwind, straining your arms and your whole body. At the same time, you cannot relax for a second, because it is very dangerous. No matter how good your protection is, if you are cut off by a truck that simply did not notice you, as is often the case, it’s all over.

I do not regret anything. Getting on a motorcycle is like joining a club. Now every motorcyclist I see on the road greets me somehow - at least just lifts his fingers off the handle. So we confess to each other that our paths are not the same as those of everyone else, that we are alone with nature and there is no iron cage around us. We are united by a different attitude to life: on the one hand, we are ready to risk it, and on the other, we value it, because we want to live the way we like it. We deliberately chose to live in nature and the opportunity to travel around the whole country.

There are several different cultures in Canada that have developed around motorcycles - on the one hand, there are biker gangs like the Hells Angels that are associated with criminal activity. On the other hand, there are suburban dads who board their cruisers to feel free. There are also those who are called "cafe raisers" because they move from one cafe to another.For us, a motorcycle is more of a hobby and ordinary trips around the city. And, of course, you look much cooler on a motorcycle than without it. I have such a tight schedule every day that riding a motorcycle is a way of remembering that I'm still only twenty-five. This is truly liberating.

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I was just happy when I bought my motorcycle - before that I had ridden in the back seat of my friend's motorcycle for years. In Canada, these girls are called “riding bitch” - and when I just got on my motorcycle, I made myself a T-shirt with the words “Nobody’s bitch”. In Canada, there are a lot more motorcycle guys than girls. They call me much more often than when I just walk down the street - but that doesn't bother me that much, because I can start from a traffic light when they are still only squeezing out the clutch, which is very cool.

A long motorcycle ride is a very special feeling due to the fact that you are completely alone with yourself. You hear nothing but the noise of the road, even if you are traveling with someone else: you cannot speak, you can only think about your own, hour after hour, locked in your helmet. You cannot afford to worry about something seriously, because you have to keep your attention on the road. It is like meditation - you have to reflect on yourself. I didn’t miss people during our trip - there is only one motorcyclist on the road.

During the trip, we often stayed in motels that look like they were brought here right from the 80s. They are unusually arranged: you just need to call before arrival and book a room. You don't need to communicate with anyone: you drive right up to the entrance to your room, pick up the keys from the mailbox - people here trust each other - and go to bed. True, the beds are bad there. In the morning you pay at the counter and leave. It seemed to us that this was correct: since we travel on motorcycles from the 80s and 70s, then we should live in the same conditions. We used paper maps - at least so that we would not be laughed at by all these older people who spoke to us at gas stations, because they themselves rode the same motorcycles in their younger years. In addition, in the Canadian province, the mobile phone picks up poorly, and it is impossible to follow the route along it.

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Fredericton - St Andrews

In Fredericton, we spent the night in a huge mansion outside the city, which was rented to us through Airbnb, and never saw the owners. It was very strange: we arrived, checked in, washed in their bathroom and left in the morning - and did not meet anyone. The city itself did not interest us - the road was more important to us. After Fredericton we arrived at St. Andrews - a very beautiful place on the shores of the Bay of Fundy. It has the highest tide in the world (and the lowest low tide) - the water rises and falls, exposing the shore for many meters. At low tide, we really wanted to get to one island in the Bay of Fundy, which can only be reached when the bottom of the bay is exposed. It can be reached by car - and we decided to drive along this wet bottom of sand and gravel on motorcycles. It was a very bad idea: we almost got bogged down. But the photos came out beautiful. Then we drove a little along the coast and ended up on a rocky beach in someone's private property. There was no one there at all - only the sea, rocks and forest - and we decided not to bother with bathing suits and climbed into the water naked. The water was icy - it's still the Atlantic Ocean - but we plunged anyway.

When I was in St. Andrews, at the insistence of my mother, I met with a friend of my father - I had not spoken to my father for many years, since he started taking drugs. He now lives in a rehabilitation center. This friend remembers him young - they were then boys from wealthy families and had fun to the fullest. It was difficult for him to talk about it, but for me this conversation was important - such a catharsis.

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St Andrews - Halifax - Prince Edward Island

In Canada, older people like to travel to the east coast: there is very beautiful nature, nice people - but at the same time it is quiet.There are no parties here. We drove to Halifax - a beautiful but very quiet city - and wondered if we should take the Cabot Trail - this is a very famous route that runs around the center of the peninsula. It is very beautiful there, but at the same time the route itself is difficult - there are many precipices and sharp turns. We decided not to go on it and instead went straight to Prince Edward Island, which all Canadians read about in childhood in the book "Anne of Green Gables", which is set right there. It was strange for me to know nothing at all about a part of my country - although I feel a kinship with all Canadians. The island is small but very beautiful and has great seafood. In addition, the stones there are red, so all the beaches and roads are pink. It looks mesmerizing. Prince Edward Island is a separate province, although very few people live there. The main source of income is tourism, so everything on this island looks somehow especially cute.

When we got there, friends advised us to have a music festival a short walk from our motel - and it turned out to be just a concert in someone's backyard. They installed an excellent audio system, lit a fire, gathered about 45 listeners, and everyone knew each other. One musician from Toronto played country folk, there was another musician from the Yukon - they just drove through these places and agreed to play at this concert. The atmosphere was amazing, very warm, and all the guests looked after us - they even gave us blankets when we got cold.

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Prince Edward Island - Quebec - Rimuski

The next day we arrived from Prince Edward Island to Quebec, and from there we left for Rimuski - this is already in the depths of the province of Quebec. Perhaps this was the most beautiful part of the trip: I have never seen anything like it. We drove through New Brunswick and we had to make a big detour because the road was blocked - some country star had an accident. In the evening we reached Rimuska and ate lobster for dinner, which the city is famous for. Lobster is eaten there along with putin - a snack of fries with salted cheese and sauce. Quite a strange combination of delicacy and fast food, but we even liked it. Putin is an unofficial Quebec specialty and is usually eaten at three in the morning with a heavy drink.

It was the end of the trip, and we were already sick of each other. My friend was very tired of the trip and on the fifth day of our trip he simply didn't want anything. I understood him - but we still had two days to go to Montreal, and I had to tell him that he can suffer if he wants - but this is not at all necessary. And that the last two days of our journey could be much more enjoyable if we put in the effort.

For me, this trip was a way to test my own ability and ability to ride a motorcycle. I'd love to ride a motorcycle in South America - I've already spent seven months there, but I think it would be even better on a motorcycle.

Photos: PackShot - stock.adobe.com, onepony - stock.adobe.com, personal archive

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