What To Read In Winter: 9 New Books For Every Taste

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What To Read In Winter: 9 New Books For Every Taste
What To Read In Winter: 9 New Books For Every Taste

Video: What To Read In Winter: 9 New Books For Every Taste

Video: A Year of Reading: Winter 2020-2021 2022, December
Anonim

The coldest time of the year is coming non / fiction fair and New Year's holidays, which means that everything is conducive to buying books. In addition to the acclaimed "Little Life" of Chania Yanagihara, the new Julian Barnes and the biography of Bella Akhmadullina, by the end of the year several more important books were published, which are definitely worth paying attention to. We have selected nine new products that will help you to improve your mood and get through the winter.

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TOM GOLD

Moon cop

Once the Moon was a symbol of the bright future of mankind - but the golden age of space exploration is in the past, and nostalgia has replaced enthusiasm. Although, of course, the longing of the British cartoonist Tom Gold is not for the real Moon and space as a premonition, but for the time when there was more peace and quiet. In the center of the plot is the story of a policeman working in a half-forgotten hole that once promised to become one of the many colonies of earthlings in space. In fact, this is a story about work, everyday life, bureaucracy, familiar to any inhabitant of our planet, and about the little joys of a monotonous life. Each spread of an ascetic comic book is a reason to slow down and envy the short, quiet dialogues between the inhabitants of the Moon and a cop who does not have serious crimes.

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DMITRY OPARIN, ANTON AKIMOV

The stories of Moscow houses told by their residents

It is difficult to love Moscow more than the journalist and historian Dmitry Oparin and the photographer Anton Akimov. They are the authors of a project that began in 2011 in the Bolshoi Gorod magazine and has grown into a book. The History of Moscow Houses is a unique encyclopedia of local lore based on the stories of old residents, consisting of 25 chapters. Each describes the history of one house and consists of architectural and historical parts, as well as interviews with residents. Houses built in the period from the 17th century to the 30s are both a part of today's capital and a portal to the history of not only architecture, but also the life of Muscovites. Thus, the archival materials, interviews and photographs collected in the book are especially precious when each such portal strives to close or turn into another office.

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RICHARD BROTIGAN

Willard and his bowling alley prizes. Perverted detective

The cult figure of the 60s and 70s, the tragic poet and prose writer Richard Brautigan, at some point experimented with genres, deconstructing established clichés in his texts. Willard and the Bowling Alley Prizes is a tragicomic parody of sadomasochistic literature and pulp fiction. The novel consists of stories of people surrounding a papier-mâché bird named Willard in a room with stolen prizes from a bowling alley. The text, divided into short chapters - a funny and sad reflection on the absurdity of being and the disunity of people - perfectly reflects all the best that was in the classical postmodernity. Surprisingly, the work is published in Russian for the first time.

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ALEKSEY IVANOV

Tobol. Many are called

The prolific writer, author of the cult "Geographer Drank The Globe", experiments with a variety of genres: he writes modern urban novels, both historical and science fiction. In the most ambitious project to date, Tobol, Aleksey Ivanov combines historical prose and fantasy in the manner of JRR Martin's A Song of Fire and Flame. However, instead of a pseudo-earth state, he describes Siberia during the reforms of Peter I. The first volume of the dilogy is being published now, and the second part will appear in the summer of 2017. Meanwhile, the author has written a script for a series based on the book, which will begin filming next year. That's not all: the documentary component will be published separately in the form of non-fiction "Wilds".

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MIKHAIL SHISHKIN

Tie coat

Each new book by Shishkin's level writers is an event.It is all the more interesting when it comes to a collection of autobiographical essays by an author hiding behind complex modernist texts in which it is difficult to recognize the feelings of the writer himself. In the title essay, Shishkin tells how, before his mother's death, he did not have time to ask her forgiveness for the time when he lived with her in the same apartment and did not speak. As in the novel-palimpsest "The Taking of Ishmael", he begins to write, starting from world literature, and ends with personal - memories of his mother dying in the hospital. The book ended up as a failed conversation. Shishkin writes unexpectedly simply and clearly, about his native language, but for him it is primarily not life, but language.

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EtGAR KERET

Seven fat years

Etgar Keret is a writer and comic book writer, screenwriter and teacher from a family of Polish Jews who emigrated to Israel in the 1960s. Some of the short stories that Keret has been writing since 1992 have already entered the compulsory school curriculum, but he is known to the Russian reader mainly thanks to Linor Goralik, who also translated this collection of autobiographical sketches of the writer. “Seven fat years” is the time between the birth of the writer's son and the death of his father, but before us is not a memoir, but rather reflections on everything and nothing. Short bright notes, written in spoken language, tell about the relatives and friends of Keret, but most importantly, about that beautiful and frightening Israel, in which a rich joyful life and the everyday life of war coexist.

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Claire North

Fifteen Lives of Harry August

Katherine Webb, aka Kate Griffin, aka Claire North, is a 30-year-old English writer who writes fantasy and science fiction, and is also studying to be a stage lighting designer in her native London. The novel "Fifteen Lives of Harry August" was a breakthrough for her, received several important awards, including an Arthur Clarke nomination. Harry August lived a long life, and then was born again and remembered the whole previous one, and then again and again. At some point, the reincarnated August joins the club of people like him, and at the end of his 11th life he receives a message from a girl from the distant future. He has a new goal - to prevent the apocalypse. Claire North's book is about society and about issues of free will and determinism, and also about friendship.

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Paul Pope

Fighting guy

Comics for children have not yet become a part of our everyday life, unlike children's books, the fashion for which is now in full swing. Meanwhile, the largest project by Paul Pope (Heavy Liquid, Batman: Year 100) has just been released in Russian, the themes and plot twists of which will be of interest to both children and adults. This is that infrequent case when the main characters-children are drawn as children, and not little skinny adults. The combination of Western comics and manga makes each spread dynamic and distinctive. This is a story - starring a demigod boy and a girl, the daughter of a superhero - about making the right choices and dealing with the high expectations of adults. It took seven years to create, which can be seen both in the perfectly verified details of the drawing, and in the subtle color scheme that does not hit the eyes.

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RICHARD BARNETT

Gin

Gin is not only one of the best alcoholic drinks, which is especially pleasant to drink during the cold and dark seasons. Its long and convoluted history is the condensed history of modern and modern Europe. Gin has come a long way from the Dutch drink jenever, which in the 16th century was distilled from juniper berries, first as a medicinal tincture, and then as alcohol. It had English entertainment establishments and domestic crimes of the 19th century, Prohibition in the United States and, finally, the status of a drink for the rich and tycoons. The story of the genie was attended by an equally interesting author: Richard Barnett is a doctor by his first education, and a historian by his second; he writes books, in particular, on the history of medicine, and also about London, and even leads special excursions around the city.

Cover: Timur Zima

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