Nowhere To Go: "Hayka" Is A Painful And Honest Drama About The Survival Of Migrant Women In Moscow

Nowhere To Go: "Hayka" Is A Painful And Honest Drama About The Survival Of Migrant Women In Moscow
Nowhere To Go: "Hayka" Is A Painful And Honest Drama About The Survival Of Migrant Women In Moscow
Video: Nowhere To Go: "Hayka" Is A Painful And Honest Drama About The Survival Of Migrant Women In Moscow
Video: STORY WA KEREN - DJ POKEMON PIKACHU \"BY HAYKA PATUNGGAL_-_LIRIK MAKER KINEMASTER [MHMMD.KAROR] 2023, February
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"Hayka" was released - one of the most talked about films last year about a young Kyrgyz girl who is forced to leave her child in a maternity hospital and look for ways to survive in Moscow. "Hayka" was nominated for an Oscar from Kazakhstan and has already received a prize in Cannes for Best Actress: Kazakh actress Samal Yeslyamova amazed the jury with the image of a woman seeking a better life and facing injustice and violence.

The filmmakers consulted with migrant aid centers and hundreds of Central Asian women in big cities to reliably portray their lives. "Hayka" was the first high-profile film statement about the situation of Central Asian women in Russia - people living in isolation and taking on the most difficult and low-paid jobs. We will tell you how Sergey Dvortsevoy's "Hayka" shows the difficulties of migrant women and why it is necessary to talk about it.

Attention: the text contains spoilers.

TEXT: Alisa Tayozhnaya, author of the telegram channel "See Once"

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In a maternity hospital toilet, a young girl of Central Asian descent opens a paper-sealed window and jumps out of the second floor. For most doctors, nurses and nannies, she is, of course, a "cuckoo" with postpartum syndrome - they see dozens of such women in a year and passed a sentence to each of them in advance. Aika, a short green-eyed brunette, twenty-five years old, takes a pain reliever with her and bites it with snow on the run. She is late where she is not allowed to be late, calls her sister with a request to lend money, her feet are drowning in the snowdrifts of the abnormal Moscow winter. Hayka, who has just given birth, should be warm and calm, but she clearly cannot afford it, something drives her away in search of money and salvation.

A clean bed and the first days with a newborn is a luxury, not the norm for Aiki. The camera rushes after the running girl, follows her shoulders, hair falling on her face, frightened eyes, and now she is already close, understandable, one that cannot be ignored in the subway or store. From an abstract "woman of Central Asia", of which there are hundreds of thousands in Moscow, thanks to the director's and cinematography decisions, Hayk becomes the only one - a unique person in captivity to humiliating circumstances common to all.

Aiki has a competitive advantage: she speaks Russian without an accent and has already worked in several places. But on the way to honest work is the lack of registration, according to all laws, a woman is subject to urgent deportation without clarifying the reasons. Constant calls to a cheap phone make it clear that Ayka owes money, and a book on organizing a sewing business partially explains why. It seems that an educated and ambitious girl came to Moscow with plans and still does not lose hope of making her dream come true. Aiki's poverty is not at all the result of her inaction, but a consequence of several deceptions and betrayals, for which she, as an underground resident of a big city, has no right to ask for justice. Experiencing bleeding right during standing work in the pinching shop - live chickens there are doused with boiling water, plucked and loaded into plastic boxes - Aika ties up her stomach and continues to pull the bloody entrails out of the chickens.

Aika and her health care little for employers: one fell ill, another will appear, there is no shortage of people willing. From the conversations of the employers, it becomes clear that for the most wretched part-time job there has long been a line of women who are accustomed to working and do not divide tasks into male and female. The first employers of Aiki, whom we see in the frame, are washed away, leaving the workers one carcass - for a long time the chicken will be the only food for the heroine.Aika is hungry: while the rest of the metro passengers, behind whose fur coats a girl with huge eyes is lost, probably easily cope with such a problem, getting food for her is a constant struggle.

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In her current life, there is simply no place for a newborn, so leaving her son to the guardianship seems to be the safest choice.

Hayka lives in the Solnechny Hostel, an illegal migrant apartment where the guests pay for the guilt of the greedy owner. The police will deport them, and they can also slap them on the back of the head and assert themselves as much as they can, giving them a shot at powerless people in a line. In the "hostel" there is no division into male and female space, which is important for many of the inhabitants - there is an anthill with corners for women and men. Aiki has a rookery behind dirty cheap curtains made of rags: a mattress and a piece of a window sill. There she again drinks painkillers, suffers from fever in a wet jacket, suffers bleeding.

There is no sisterhood at all: a competitor takes Aikin's work, the women in the room shout at each other and most of all they value satiety and silence - no one performs feats in relation to each other. On the way, Aika thinks out how to at least slightly ease the pain: she chops icicles from the roofs, puts them in a bag, and then on her stomach. And he goes to look for work again - in a cafe, at a gas station, removes snow, begs for a place on the set and becomes a replacement for a Kyrgyz cleaner in a veterinary clinic. There Hayka finds the first clean toilet and the first sympathetic face - a woman a little older. Together with their little son, who has chickenpox, they hide behind a curtain in the back room - with their help, Hayka acquires a contact with an underground doctor, who lends her an IV in debt. It turns out that all this time, with a tied belly and a breast full of milk, the girl was on the verge of life and death. She helps the cleaning lady who saved her with a couple of Russian words: the countrywoman does not know the language well, nods and learns on the go, not understanding what is required of her.

The ending puts everything in its place: the raped Asian woman says nothing to the police, fears deportation like fire and decides to give birth in Moscow. Due to some serious mafiosi money, her only way is to hide. The planning horizon is a couple of hours. In her current life, there is simply no place for a newborn, so leaving her son to the guardianship seems to be the safest choice.

Growing up in Kazakhstan, director Sergei Dvortsevoy admits in an interview how much he was surprised by the number of newborn children of Central Asian women left in Moscow maternity hospitals and could not compare this fact with personal experience: for a traditional Eastern family, children are the most important value that they do not risk. And turning to the funds for helping migrants and refugees, the director and screenwriter learned the true picture and scale of the disaster: the abandoned children were joined by the broken destinies of women who cannot find help either among their own people or among strangers. It seems pointless to seek support from authorities living on bribes from migrants.

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The likes of Aika are separated

and from the social system, and from the diaspora: a loner who has arrived in Moscow survives according to different rules than a group

Asian migrant women are completely separated from the rest of Muscovites by their illegal status and humiliating position: they take on the lowest paid and physically hard work, live in bondage for years, more often than others fall into slavery and are forced to adapt to the most severe conditions. People like Hayka are separated from both the social system and the diaspora: a loner who has arrived in Moscow survives according to different rules than a group, so that violence remains a matter in which no one wants to interfere. A woman without male protection, without a clan ready to fit in for her, finds herself in a string of situations that are impossible with married and wealthy people.

The script for "Aiki" would seem to be an exaggeration if it were not for the confessions of the directors and the actress about the dozens of documentary interviews they conducted to compose the heroine's biography - from having to work the day after giving birth to bankruptcy, from working in a pinch shop to living registration in "beds". It is important that most of the roles in "Ike" were played by non-professional actors who survive on low wages in Moscow. The stories that three-quarters of the money are sent home by migrants are not just statistics - most of the people we see in the frame have experienced such an experience. There is an alternative infrastructure for migrants, but only modern Russian documentary filmmakers are interested in it (for example, the programs "Artdocfest" or "Messages to Man") - Russian art cinema rather ignores it.

The closed communities and the inaccessibility of official figures make it impossible for a constructive dialogue on the rights and problems of migrants, including illegal ones. At the same time, the underground community is functioning, but only a few volunteers and benefactors know about it in detail: programs of assistance and adaptation are surrounded by speculative xenophobic news, and the official government broadcasts only prohibitive policies. By and large, almost no one cares about the fate of women like Aiki; their flow does not imply sympathy. "Come in large numbers" - the public consensus on this topic, no matter how painful it may be to admit it.

Meanwhile, Dvortsevoy's feature film based only on real facts is undoubted evidence of the "humanitarian catastrophe of Sobyanin Moscow," where the dilemma, following the example of Dardennov's film "Child," is resolved not as an existential drama, but as a tragedy of coercion. "Hayka" is not only a must-see movie for any person who is interested in human stories in modern Russia. This is a political call for empathy - for the outcasts (not necessarily women, not necessarily Central Asian and not necessarily oppressed), whom sooner or later everyone, regardless of gender, origin and income, can become in a corrupt, sanctimonious and racist society. A few unfortunate coincidences are enough.

PHOTOS: Volga

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