10 Favorite Films Of Director And Screenwriter Zhenya Berkovich

Table of contents:

10 Favorite Films Of Director And Screenwriter Zhenya Berkovich
10 Favorite Films Of Director And Screenwriter Zhenya Berkovich
Video: 10 Favorite Films Of Director And Screenwriter Zhenya Berkovich
Video: HIS SON'S BEST FRIEND - GAY SHORT FILM 2023, February
Anonim

IN THE RUBRIC "VIDEOTEKA" our heroines talk about their favorite films and TV shows - important, vivid, inspiring, those that are hard to forget once you see them. In this episode, director and screenwriter Zhenya Berkovich confesses her love for Twin Peaks and recalls all the pictures over which she laughed and cried the most.

INTERVIEW: Alisa Taezhnaya

PHOTOS: Ekaterina Starostina

MAKEUP: Anastasia Pryadkova

Image
Image

Zhenya Berkovich

Director, screenwriter

At the age of nine or ten, they began to leave us alone at home after school, and we

my sister and I watched everything that accumulated

in the parent's nightstand

under the TV

Image
Image

Cinema is one of my biggest complexes in life. I don’t understand anything in cinema, I don’t have the habit of watching films on a regular basis, and I don’t have a “watched base” either. The family also had televisions, and the Vidic appeared - my dad is generally an experienced moviegoer - but in this sense, no one has ever worked on me and my sister. They watched something with us, something without us: nothing was forbidden, nothing was shown on purpose, they were not kicked out of the room on bed scenes. With books it was different: books by three generations and two clans were chosen, discussed between adults and always with us. We were read aloud, we read aloud, we ourselves endlessly wrote something, barely having learned to speak. And the movie somehow was and was.

But there were also rare exceptions. For example, once a grandmother, when my sister and I were seven years old, put us on TV to watch "Ordinary Fascism" - then on May 9 Romm was shown on the air, and not just "Heavenly Slow". The grandmother said: "You will cry, but it is necessary." It was an impression of such strength that watching a movie was not postponed at all - as if information about the structure of the world was pumped into you intravenously, bypassing the eyes and ears, in a huge dosage.

At the age of nine or ten, they began to leave us alone at home after school, and my sister and I watched everything that accumulated in the parent's bedside table under the TV. They chose what was interesting, boring like "Night on Earth" (now it is one of my favorite films), they started and dropped. Since the parents watched any complex arthouse somewhere outside the house, in the nightstand was mainly what was sold in the stalls on the Haymarket. We've watched The People vs. Larry Flynt, Forrest Gump, The Devil's Advocate, Interview With The Vampire, Lolita, and Titanic two hundred times. I was terribly curious about sex and violence, so I also had Cronenberg's Wild at Heart and Car Crash in the top (I’m afraid to watch the latter since then, it remained in my head like utter inhuman porn).

And then my whole life was taken over by the theater studio, and between about fourteen and twenty-three years old, I watched almost nothing. In fact, there are a lot of films in the end, and they, of course, influenced me terribly, but it's more about stories, heroes, behaviors. That it is bad to serve the devil, and you have to fight for your rights, even if you just publish a porno magazine, that you need to warn the dude if he was given raw gunpowder (Karl!), And that the ideal man looks like Jeremy Irons.

Now I watch three or four films a month, rarely in the movies, more often at home on my laptop and, as a rule, later than everyone else, when already a hundred people, whose opinion I trust, said that this is a masterpiece - so-so strategy, in fact. When you don't expect a masterpiece, you rejoice much more. But when your own opinion coincides with the opinion of a bunch of smart people, this is a separate additional joy. The films that I laughed and cried the most were included in my final top ten - for me this is just the only clear and important criterion.

Image
Image

Christopher Morris, 2010

Four lions

This is my favorite type of movie and stories in general: a few idiots do something stupid, they turn out badly, until suddenly a stupid comedy turns into a real drama. Here, four tightly repulsed guys decided to become Islamic terrorists and explode in the London marathon. At every step there is some kind of fierce joint, all this is very funny until you catch yourself sitting at the screen and shouting out loud: “Don't, dude! Oh please! Well, give it up … no, don't, put it on the ground slowly … Well, no-no … That's it. " Awfully sad movie.

Image
Image

Jemaine Clement, Taika Waititi, 2014

Real ghouls

Also, a few idiots do something very funny and bad, and at the end everyone cries, however, already from emotion. It seems to be complete nonsense, well, comedy and comedy. But everything is perfectly accurate in every micro-detail, and such a cool mixture of the most stamped movie genres - a movie about vampires, plus a youth comedy about neighbors, plus a story of growing up, plus romcom, plus my adored mocumentari - that you can't tear yourself away. And this is a terribly tender film. I can't watch classic rom-coms at all, I need everything the same, but about ghouls. It is also a rare case when a film can and should be watched in dubbing made by the excellent director Sasha Vartanov. I watched this and that - dubbing, honestly, is not worse than the original, sometimes even better.

Image
Image

Peter Jackson, 1989

Meet Fibla

My third film in the series "tin, tin, this is humor, we would have been sued right away." And again, a bunch of jerks are doing something really bad (talent show this time). The artist Ksenia Sorokina and I watched it in the snowy Nizhnevartovsk, having a little headlong from longing for the second month of our stay there. In Moscow, I have not revisited the film, but I suspect that the degree of frenzy does not change from the location of the viewer. I can't believe that the author of Fiblov (and the great "Living Carrion") then began to shoot about hobbits. I think this is his twin brother. Or a bad clone. In general, there are not so many full-length puppet films for adults in the world, and such a combination of masterfully invented and made dolls and decorations, a billion very funny gags beyond the brink of a foul and at the same time a clear, evil and clever author's thought is rarely found at all.

Image
Image

Martin McDonagh, 2012

Seven psychopaths

In fact, there could have been any of the films of any of the McDonn brothers, but about “Psychopaths” less often connoisseurs begin to moan “Well, this is not a movie-oh-oh … This is a teleplay….”. And again this is an incredibly kind movie about frostbitten idiots: death, blood, murders in a pan of the highest humanism. However, Christopher Walken can be shown to me for several days without any story, and I will be fine. It’s a shame that McDonagh doesn’t make films from his plays for the theater. They are all about genius.

Image
Image

David Lynch, 1980

Elephant man

The first and last time I saw my dad crying over a film, and he probably watched tens of thousands of them during our acquaintance. Well, I remember myself crying over him ten times, and, by the way, one more time. This is a very rare case when, in order to really cry in the movies, I don't have to laugh for an hour and a half with humor beyond good and evil. Lynch doesn't care what anyone thinks - he just takes your heart and holds it tightly for 1 hour and 24 minutes, and then puts it back a little bit to others. And it's also funny that this is not the first film by Lynch (such is the non-Lynch film), but the second. The first one is “Eraser Head”, where everything is as we love it, and then “Dune” and “Blue Velvet”. Where did this Elephant come from? It is not clear, and it does not matter. It's good that he is.

Image
Image

David Lynch, Mark Frost, 1990-1991

Twin Peaks

The only TV series that I watched as a teenager and that influenced my whole life precisely as a movie, as a world into which you enter and begin to live in it. I was in love with Agent Cooper, I can still list all the heroes and locations, I love clothes in the style of American teenage 80s and 90s.

Even before the film, I read the book of the diaries of Laura Palmer and Cooper, and it all started with her. I had a friend in the country, the real Laura Palmer, we read this book together, borrowed from the local library. She tried to teach me how to smoke, talked about her Very Sexual Adventures, while in her outer life M. was an excellent student from an intelligent conservative family, and at the age of twelve she played Bryusov by heart. Since then, I have lived with the feeling that I am Donna, Lauras are walking around, but I want to be Audrey at all, and the owls are not what they seem to be, and the coffee in American eateries is liquid and tasteless (that's the way it is). Later, my parents and I watched the series itself: at first we peeped from behind the door (it was late), then we saw the replay on TV already legally. I couldn't watch the third season. I just couldn't, that's all.

Image
Image

Harmony Corinne, 2007

Mister loneliness

We also watched this movie with the artist Sorokina - only not in Nizhnevartovsk, but in Nyagan. There was even more snow around; in general, the month of December in the Khanty-Mansiysk Autonomous Okrug is an excellent environment for watching good films. “Mr. Loneliness” is another story on my list about the incredible fragility of human existence, madness, paradox and tenderness. About strange people who tried (to become their idols, to make a great show, to fall from an airplane without a parachute), they seemed to fail, some died, but we looked and became a little better.

Image
Image

Sebastian Schipper, 2015

Victoria

Dad buzzed all my ears with this film - every my arrival home and the obligatory conversation about the movie I watched ended with the question: “Have you watched Victoria?” And so I finally looked recently. And she went nuts. A one-sided film (this in itself is fascinating), a very simple story: a young girl in Berlin tried to commit suicide, got into a hell of a mess, then spoilers. I can look at Berlin in much the same way as at Christopher Walken - that is, endlessly.

Image
Image

Alexander Rastorguev, 2005

Wild, wild beach. The heat of the tender

Best documentary I've seen. The scariest and most filled with love. This film is very difficult for me, my idea of ​​ethics in the dock here just screams with indignation and rage. This is not the case with living people. Living people are not allowed this way. And animals too. This is not a movie, but one big trigger, worse than Breaking the Waves. But I think that the late Rastorguev himself will deal with those who met him in the next world with questions about professional ethics, and this film will remain for us.

Image
Image

Alexander Gorchilin, 2015

#COMUNARUSIZHITGOROSHO

The debut documentary film by Alexander Gorchilin, the one who later shot "Acid". Few people saw it, and even fewer people appreciated it, and I'm sorry, because the movie is wonderful. It is also about fools who went to do something important and fucked everything up, but found something much more important.

In fact, this, of course, is not a classic dock, because the "fools" here are the actors of the Gogol Center, who really went with the director Kirill Serebrennikov to the Russian outback to observe the life of the Russian people, preparing for the rehearsals of the play of the same name. And of course, the guys in the frame are playing - such well-fed Moscow hipsters who were told to go to the people, but they do not understand anything and do not want to understand. They interview drunken men in a snipe, try to make verbatim with a cow, and in the evenings they sit down decorously to discuss their observations, and everyone tells very seriously how deep and important they had today experience.

This brilliant and very few documentary filmmakers accessible evil self-irony in Gorchilin's film reaches its peak when the guys begin to destroy an abandoned village house with some sadistic and completely senseless rage. Here you go! This is where the Moscow youth saw you all! In the end, there is still love, because Sasha is all about love.

Image
Image

Popular by topic