Starring: Olivia Colman And Her Best Films

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Starring: Olivia Colman And Her Best Films
Starring: Olivia Colman And Her Best Films
Video: Starring: Olivia Colman And Her Best Films
Video: Olivia Colman and Colin Firth Clip 2023, February
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The main character of the Oscar ceremony, which took place last Sunday, undoubtedly, was Olivia Colman: at first, despite the bookmaker's odds, she received the award for Best Actress, and then the unofficial Audience Award - for the most touching speech of the evening, which made some laugh shed a tear. These three minutes, saturated with the emotions of "a girl who rehearsed her speech in front of the TV", in themselves clarify why in her native Britain, the actress has long been considered a national treasure. But the track record, of course, is not limited to them.

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Dmitry Kurkin

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Coleman's victory may have been unexpected (first of all, for the actress herself, who rode the carousel serenely the day before the Oscars), but it looks absolutely deserved. Her role in The Favorite is one of those challenges that require mastery of acting body language and emotional multidimensionality. Queen Anne in her performance is a broken woman with seriously damaged health - and at the same time a domineering monarch; a person of deep affections and unpredictable whims; easily suggested and vulnerable, but quickly losing her temper and not allowing her entourage to play for too long: the one who decides that he can pull her strings, reckoning overtakes quickly.

Playing queens is common for Coleman. She managed to get her share of costume historical dramas - and this is an almost obligatory baptism of fire for prominent British actors. And nevertheless, the role of Elizabeth II in the TV series "Crown" promises to be for her no less, if not a great test. And the reason is not so much that her predecessor Claire Foy set the bar high, but that the new role contradicts Coleman herself: “I don't hold back my emotions. The Queen cannot behave like that. She must be cold-blooded with everyone, and she was specially trained to keep emotions to herself … And I can burst into tears from any sad story. " She does not have to get used to the image according to Stanislavsky's system for this - the natural empathy, which became her hallmark, was inherited by the actress from her parents, who “cried over everything that went on TV”.

Not that in the new season of The Crown, Elizabeth II had absolutely no reason to give vent to feelings and go beyond the protocol - (spoiler!) There are enough of them, from the disaster in Aberfan, which claimed the lives of more than a hundred residents of the mining village, to the death of Churchill, which became for the queen with a personal blow. But the prim publicity of the high society for Coleman, in life - a modest family man with a very down-to-earth sense of humor (being at a reception at Buckingham Palace hosted by Prince William, she at some point whispered to her husband: “Let's go and hold a roll of toilet paper”, - of course, they did it), has never been a native cup of tea and almost always - a source for anecdotes. “We came [to a restaurant in London] and the owner came out to us, said 'Hello!' And kissed me. And I thought: “Ooh, they recognize me, it's interesting,” Colman recalled in an interview seven years ago. - Then, at the end of the evening, he came back and said: 'Sorry, I took you for my friend.'

Choosing mature roles did not come without a side effect: Coleman even had to correct his date of birth on his wikipedia page, where

she was old

for eight years

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Modesty didn't stop Olivia from being persistent. By her twenty-five, having managed to change several temporary jobs (not only washing the floors, mentioned in the Oscar speech: “The secretary came out of me cheerful, but not very good”), the graduate of the Old Vic theater school did not abandon her attempts to gain a foothold in the acting profession. The chance turned up in the early 2000s, when Coleman made her debut in sketches by Mitchell and Webb (sort of like Fry and Laurie on British television in the 2000s).They were followed by a couple dozen more comedy roles, including in The Office, Black's Bookstore and Absurd Science, Peter Serafinovich's parody of educational programs.

Coleman could have been stuck for a long time in the role of "funny woman in the wings", able to steal the show from time to time, but, fortunately, she learned to recognize the pitfalls of a typical casting and not to grab onto everything. “I think I'm interested in atypical roles,” said the actress in 2016. "I have given up on flat characters before, but such an opportunity is a luxury, in fact."

A breakthrough to this luxury happened in the next decade, after Paddy Considine (a co-star in "Kind of Tough Cop") invited her to his first feature film. The drama "Tyrannosaurus", where Coleman played a woman trapped in the grip of family abuse, forced compatriots to evaluate her acting spectrum in a new way. Choosing more mature roles did not come without a side effect - Coleman even had to correct her date of birth on her wikipedia page, where for some reason she was aged eight years. And although she had to wait several more years for invitations from Hollywood, in Britain during this time she was awarded four BAFTA awards.

Five more films and TV series with Olivia Colman

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Tyrannosaurus

The widower Joseph, unsuccessfully pouring alcohol into the pain of loss, meets second-hand saleswoman Hannah and tries to wrest her from the clutches of her abuser husband James - partly to stifle his own remorse. A harsh and unattractive portrait of domestic violence in its naturalism, the metastases of which always grow deeper than it seems from the outside.

The role in Considine's indie drama, according to Coleman herself, became a turning point for her in her career: in Tyrannosaurus, she manages to overturn the notion that only “typical victims” are trapped in psychological violence, in which the notorious victimization is allegedly protected by nature … “After one of the shows, someone used the word 'bedding'. I think they are absolutely wrong. Hannah is very strong; for all that she goes through every day, she can still see the good in people."

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Beach Murder

Like any good series that starts with a small-town murder, the three seasons of Chris Chibnell's Broadchurch by asking "who did this?" mask a discussion about the nature of evil, ethics, violence, and piecing together. And in this story, Inspector Ellie Miller, for whom the victims are not a line in a police report, but neighbors, turns out to be an important social glue between the establishment and ordinary people, each of whom lives his own drama and reacts to the tragedy in his own way.

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Night administrator

The role that Coleman brought to the Golden Globes might well have not been: in the original source, the novel of the same name by John Le Carré, Special Agent Burr was a man. The director of the series, Suzanne Beer, not only pushed through the change of gender, but also made her heroine pregnant - at the request of Coleman, who was expecting a child during the filming (“We did not inflate this topic - after all, spies also get pregnant”). Burr, recruiting a hotel manager (Tom Hiddleston) to spy on the gun baron (Hugh Laurie), acts as the moral tuning fork of a tense story in Beer’s design.

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The Iron Lady

The controversial biopic, in which Coleman played Margaret Thatcher's daughter Carol, became another step, without which the recent success at the Oscars would hardly have been possible). Forced to watch her mother fall into dementia day after day (a similar role Coleman played around the same time in the TV drama "The Exile", where her heroine was caring for her father suffering from Alzheimer's), Carol leads a struggle that initially seems hopeless …

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Thirteenth tale

Margaret Lee (Coleman) travels to the family mansion of fiction star Vida Winter (Vanessa Redgrave) to record her biography. The mission is not easy, because the writer, who is about to die of cancer, has managed to make herself a reputation as a "storyteller", in each next interview she comes up with a new biography. She has her reasons for such secrecy, and the more Margaret learns about Vida's life, the more she becomes uncomfortable. The film adaptation of the gothic detective Diana Setterfield, not even with a double bottom, but with many secret doors and mirrors, in which the heroine Colman - investigator, fan, hostage - will see the reflection of her own psychological trauma.

Photos: FOX, P&I Films

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