I See Naked People: Tragicomedy "Pure" About Sexuality And OCD

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I See Naked People: Tragicomedy "Pure" About Sexuality And OCD
I See Naked People: Tragicomedy "Pure" About Sexuality And OCD
Video: I See Naked People: Tragicomedy "Pure" About Sexuality And OCD
Video: Pure Romance Party 2019 with Denise Marsh (Deluxe Kit) 2023, February
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Dmitry Kurkin

TV mini-series "Pure" aired on UK Channel 4, an unexpected dramedy about obsessive-compulsive disorder and sexuality, based on a true story. Passed almost imperceptibly and without big names (Joe Cole, who played one of the Shelby brothers in Peaky Blinders, is almost the main star in the cast), "Pure" is nevertheless worth spending three hours on it.

Although those around her would never suspect that Marnie was anything different from them, she herself, since adolescence, has been waging a daily war with her mind. On the street, at a party, on public transport - anywhere - she constantly sees unbridled sex. “It's like seeing dead people - only I see naked people,” says the heroine herself. For a while, she manages to endure this non-disconnectable "pornhub" in her head. But when a modest family celebration in her brain turns into a wild orgy with the participation of her parents, it becomes clear that Marnie is one step away from breaking loose and being branded as a "pervert" - a stigma with which it will be difficult to live in her native Scottish town.

For salvation - and answers to what is happening to her - Marnie goes to London. After hearing the expert's suggestion that obsessive fantasies can be an expression of suppressed homosexuality, Marnie goes to test the theory in a lesbian club and quickly becomes convinced of its erroneousness. It becomes much easier for her when a new acquaintance explains to her the peculiarity of life in a multi-million dollar metropolis: in a larger city you are an anonymous person, its inhabitants do not care about you, "as long as you do not try to rob them or talk to them." This thought is reassuring - but it also turns out to be wrong.

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The heading "Pure" is short for "Pure O", a shortened version of the term "purely obsessional OCD". This "pure" OCD is an understudied condition that some consider a form and others a phase of obsessive-compulsive disorder. Because of him, a person is haunted by obsessive thoughts, however, she or he does not perform physical compulsive actions - only mental rituals.

The visions can be very different, but Rose Cartwright, the author of the biopic Pure, adapted for the series, got sexual fantasies. “People are ashamed to talk about such things. I have lived with this shame for most of my life, although at some point I just didn't give a damn,”recalls Cartwright, for whom the favorable reviews of the book came as a surprise. “I realized that I can talk about it freely, and I think people will be comforted by the fact that it is not necessary to hide it - it’s not so embarrassing, you can talk about it and people will accept it.”

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The very appearance of "Pure" - after "Lady Dynamite", "Good Doctor", "Atypical" and other attempts, successful and not so, to tell about how people with mental disabilities live is a sure sign that the attitude to the topic mental health in society is gradually changing. If the series had been released ten years ago, it would most likely have turned out to be either a collection of jokes about "naked and funny", or a hypertrophied tear-maker about how difficult it is to be different. Pure's undoubted success is that it maintains a great balance, thanks to which it does not misinterpret the original story (Cartwright admits that due to her condition, she “did not become an outcast, did not lose relationships, did not lose friends), and remains dynamic. The ridiculous situations that Marnie gets into over and over again seem ridiculous for the time being: the editing of "Pure" constantly reminds us that OCD attacks are not a joke (here, too, it was not without personal experience - panic attacks from showrunner Kirsty Swain).

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"Pure" is also an honest conversation about sexuality that is not easy to carry out.Every second Marnie realizes that her visions are unreal and that, contrary to her uncontrolled imagination, she will not pounce on others. But this, firstly, does not diminish the burning feeling of shame (even when people around you are understanding, progressive and generally sympathetic to you personally), and secondly, it only encourages further doubts. Where does the obsession end and the usual desire to have sex begin?

Pure has no answers - and that's great. Having succumbed to the temptation to wave a magic wand, "fix" everything and explain everything to everyone, the scriptwriters would deprive the show of the only thing for which these short six episodes are worth watching at all - the sense of genuineness with which the series expresses a simple, in general, thesis. That there are no “normal” people, and that there are things that you just have to live with.

PHOTOS: Channel 4

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