What's With Your Eyes?: I Have A Coloboma Of The Iris

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What's With Your Eyes?: I Have A Coloboma Of The Iris
What's With Your Eyes?: I Have A Coloboma Of The Iris

Video: What's With Your Eyes?: I Have A Coloboma Of The Iris

Video: Coloboma 2022, December
Anonim

Coloboma is a congenital anomaly of the eye, in which the integrity of one of its structures is violated, for example, the eyelid, iris, retina or optic nerve. Normally, their formation is completed by the seventh week of fetal development, but sometimes this does not happen and a defect or hole remains in one of the membranes of the eye - this is a coloboma. Sometimes this genetic condition is inherited, but it can also occur for the first time in the family. Depending on the location of the coloboma, it may or may not affect vision or the appearance of the eye. Stylist Zhenya Kometa told how she lives with congenital iris coloboma and what she can advise parents of children with this feature.

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OLGA LUKINSKAYA

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I was born in Tashkent in 1991, the second child in the family. Why I have a defect in the iris - no one knows, everyone in the family has normal vision. True, during pregnancy, my mother experienced severe stress - she lost both parents, and then found out that she was pregnant with me. She was very bad, did not want anything - but in the end she put up with me and now says that I saved her life.

Until I could speak, no one understood whether I saw how I felt and whether I needed to intervene. According to my mother, she was surprised that I could not distinguish objects near, but in the distance I saw better than her. In kindergarten, I put on my first glasses. Eyesight was poor (I have myopia and astigmatism), we often visited doctors, but there was no talk of radical treatment - the doctors said that the operation was impossible. I always had a lot of friends, but, of course, at school they sometimes called me a bespectacled person, it was insulting. I didn't tell anyone about this - I could cry quietly and move on. Friends in the yard always paid attention to my eyes: someone admired, and someone even got scared and ran away.

I remember one day my mother and I went to an open day at a hospital, where specialists from the United States arrived. I bragged about a couple of learned English words, and we talked very nicely with the doctors in a playful way. They examined me on some cool apparatus, which we did not have then, and gave me toys. But even doctors from America could not do anything, since coloboma is an underdevelopment of the eye and at that time technology did not allow it to be corrected. Nevertheless, I did not feel any discomfort: there was neither pain nor photophobia. At the age of thirteen, when my parents and I moved to live in Moscow, I began to wear lenses and I wear them to this day.

I always had an exemption from physical education, doctors did not allow me to run, jump, strain - but, of course, as a child, I still ran around the yard with other children. Eyesight deteriorated with age (now I have minus eleven), but I only corrected the lenses, periodically undergoing preventive examinations. At the age of twenty, I visited the Helmholtz Ophthalmological Hospital, where I was offered two types of interventions. First, it was possible to correct vision, as many people with myopia do, without coloboma. The result, however, would most likely be short-lived. Secondly, it was possible to perform an aesthetic operation that would change the appearance of the pupil (aesthetic correction of the shape of the iris is one of the most difficult ophthalmic operations; colored contact lenses can also be used to change the appearance. Approx. ed.).

I never worried about how my pupils looked - I took it for granted, I was not shy, I was not hiding from people. Once on the Internet I met a girl from Kazakhstan who has the same diagnosis, only blue eyes and one hundred percent vision. Then I finally realized that coloboma may not affect vision at all, this is just a defect in the pupil - I just have myopia and astigmatism in addition. At twenty-five, I started fitness, listening carefully to the sensations.I live like everyone else, spend a lot of time at the computer or with the phone, do not take medications and feel like an ordinary person.

It happens that in a conversation with new people, they examine my eyes, admire, call someone else to see. I get compliments all the time. Now I am twenty-eight, I am married, I have a favorite job and I plan to become a mother. I was always sure that I was going to have a cesarean section, but the ophthalmologist explained that it may not be necessary - it will be finally decided, however, by a council of doctors.

From the age of twenty-three, when I began to post posts with the hashtag #colobomaraduzhki, I began to receive a huge number of personal messages. Mostly mothers of very young or newly born children write to me with the same peculiarity as mine. Parents are worried, but there is little information: doctors cannot really say anything, and the child is not yet talking and cannot communicate his feelings. They ask me to tell about my life with this diagnosis, about how I grew up, whether I was offended in childhood, what kind of vision I have, whether I did operations - they ask many, many questions.

I answer questions, wish you health, reassure and always give the main advice - love your children as they are. In no case do not show them your anxiety about the eyes, because the child is "not like everyone else." My mom took a calm approach, and it seems to me that it helped, I remembered my peculiarity only when they asked me: "What's wrong with your eyes?" I encourage parents to tell their children as often as possible that they are beautiful, so that in the future they will not be ashamed of their appearance.

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