Lift My Eyes: What Billie Eilish Sings About On Debut Album

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Lift My Eyes: What Billie Eilish Sings About On Debut Album
Lift My Eyes: What Billie Eilish Sings About On Debut Album
Video: Lift My Eyes: What Billie Eilish Sings About On Debut Album
Video: Billie Eilish - Ocean Eyes (Official Music Video) 2023, February
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Dmitry Kurkin

A few weeks before the release of his debut album Billie Eilish received unexpected praise from Foo Fighters frontman Dave Grohl, who stated that his daughters listened to Eilish with the same fervor with which teenagers listened to his band in 1991 (Nirvana, you may have heard of them in the nineties), and this, in his opinion, proves that rock is not dead. Labels like "Kurt Cobain for the Netflix Generation" are now going to be tough for Billy to get rid of - comparisons like these stick more securely than gum to a ribbed sole. But Grohl is really right about some things, and it's not at all about the vitality of the rock, to which the record "When We All Fall Asleep, Where Do We Go?" has, in truth, an extremely indirect relationship.

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Genres, trends and subcultures are changing, but the demand for the angular and unkempt pop heroes who embody the teenage sense of alienation never falls. And it is not so important who will take this strange throne - a long-haired school outsider in a bike shirt or a seventeen-year-old girl with the look of a wolf (who, by the way, never went to school) - it is important that the place should not be empty.

Billie Eilish has every chance, if not to gain a foothold on this throne, then stay on it for a little more than one season. Her finest hour, comparable in scale to Bibermania - she just broke the record for pre-ordering an album in iTunes and in a matter of days sold out tickets for her next world tour - the daughter of Los Angeles actors meets with the same detached face «Like wow, dude”As a couple of years ago, when she first attracted attention. Then the song "Ocean Eyes" became a hit, which her older brother, exclusive producer and co-author Finneas O'Connell gave her to stage a dance number. And even if this is nothing more than a legend, invented somewhere in the bowels of the Interscope label (the bad whisper that Eilish is an "inauthentic" factory pop star exploiting the image of a depressed teenager, it continues to spread - as if the concept of authenticity at least something- something worth it in the era of social networks, each of whose users in one way or another broadcasts a certain filtered image), she says something about the raw potential of the artist.

Billy is still a growing up teenager with all the ensuing consequences like limited reflection

and questionable ways of expressing yourself

And the potential is really great - so much so that Billy herself has not yet fully coped with it. The single "wish you were gay", written on behalf of a girl disappointed that her heterosexual romantic interest was not reciprocal ("Spare my pride, don't say I'm not your type, tell me better that you have a different sexual orientation"), has already attracted criticism from the LGBT groups on the singer. But this is still a harmless example of insensitivity. A couple of years ago, Eilish, along with her brother, in the best traditions of Nick Cave, carelessly fantasized about a trip in a car with the corpses of friends in the trunk ("Bellyache"). Regardless of the hype that accompanied her, Billy is still a growing up teenager with all the ensuing consequences such as limited reflection and questionable ways of expressing herself: for the album intro, she did not find anything more elegant than the sound of saliva spitting out when removing the mouthguard to correct the bite.

But where the conscious in Eilish fails, the unconscious works great: whether it is the aesthetics of clips, written out either from American Horror Story, or from the forums of creepypasta, or deliberately annoying production of songs that come out of nowhere and go nowhere. There are enough numbers on the album, but here they sound not like a bug, but like a feature - scraps of disturbing dreams that are not subject to either logic or the will of the dreaming. According to the artist herself, the idea for the album unwound by itself after she wrote "bury a friend", a kind of story of a slender man whispering from under the bed.The question "When we all fall asleep, where do we go?" not idle for Eilish, who is haunted from time to time by recurring nightmares - and sometimes sleep paralysis. She, apparently, has a quite substantive research interest.

Ultimately, "When We All Fall Asleep, Where Do We Go?" - it's just a good debut, catchy and memorable. “Bad guy” would easily fit into club playlists, “ilomilo” could be performed by pop classic Joe Meek, also a lover of strange sounds and exotic reverberation, and “my strange addiction” and “all the good girls go to hell” make it clear why the Internet is so obsessed with the idea of ​​a song between Eilish and Lorde (in the first places, it really sounds like the younger sister of a New Zealand artist, who also shot long before her adulthood). And as for the message with the capital M, which will inevitably be required of a pop star of her caliber, you can find it at least in "xanny", a track that warns of the unhealthy hobby of her peers for pharmaceuticals - and specifically zanax - but also, encouraging. Teenage years (or, in Billy's version, "after nine years") is a worrying time, but in the end everything will be fine.

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