16 Favorite Films Of Film Critic Katerina Beloglazova

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16 Favorite Films Of Film Critic Katerina Beloglazova
16 Favorite Films Of Film Critic Katerina Beloglazova

Video: 16 Favorite Films Of Film Critic Katerina Beloglazova

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IN THE RUBRIC "VIDEOTEKA" our heroines talk about their favorite films and TV shows - important, vivid, inspiring, those that are hard to forget once you see them. In this episode, film critic Katerina Beloglazova admires Robocop and shares her memories of how she was captured by the world of cinema and never let go of her.

INTERVIEW: Alisa Taezhnaya

PHOTOS: Alexander Karnyukhin

MAKEUP: Irene Shimshilashvili

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Katerina Beloglazova

film critic, curator of film programs at the Moscow School of New Cinema

Now I don't watch TV shows at all. And then I told my mother that I dream of doing nothing and watching movies on TV all day

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As a child, I watched a lot of movies on VHS. My favorite pastime was to go to the passage at Dobryninskaya (it is still interesting in itself - a huge and looped, a whole maze) and choose films there in a stall according to descriptions on videotapes. That is, my story with cinema really began with a video library. And, of course, first of all, these were children's films: "Beethoven", the first, second, third parts of "Home Alone", "Mrs. Doubtfire", "Matilda", "Mouse Hunt", "The Parent Trap" in Volodarsky's translation, "King of the Air" and generally sentimental films about the friendship of children and animals. There was, for example, such a film - clearly the second series, but I really liked - "Clapperboard and Stinkers", about how a group of friends rescues a seal from the zoo, transporting it to the sea in a trailer from a bathtub attached to their bicycles.

Recently I realized that I was really attracted to action films and martial arts films. The benchmark was Die Hard, but deep down I loved Sylvester Stallone the most: Rambo and all the parts of Rocky. I also remember very well the cassette with the film "Prison in Air" with Nicolas Cage. I watched Mortal Kombat with interest. I loved the cult Waterworld and later realized that at some point my favorite director was Kevin Reynolds - the director of another outstanding film with Kevin Costner, Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves. Well, Alan Rickman - the Sheriff of Nottingham there - cut my heart out with a spoon. Obviously, I also loved Chuck Norris very much and practiced my signature roundhouse kick whenever I got the chance.

Among other things, I liked stupid comedies, but not all. For example, "Dumb and Dumber" was boring, although I can't forget the scene where Jeff Daniels freezes his tongue to the funicular. With the same Jeff Daniels, there was another film in my collection - a second-rate rom-com "Trial and Error" with a plot like "Irony of Fate", only more primitive and about a trial, with remarks like: "Your Honor, my honor demands …". Repeatedly watched the film "Man on Call" with Rob Schneider as an unlucky aquarium cleaner who was forced to become a gigolo and succeeded in this business thanks to his ingenuity, patience and kindness. Of course, I did not pass "Scary Movie" - again all the parts - and the comedy with Leslie Nielsen. Dogma was a complete delight.

An important source of cinema in my childhood was TV. There, one could accidentally stumble upon Spielberg's "Close Encounters of the Third Degree" or the film "Big" by Penny Marshall about a boy who wanted to grow up and become Tom Hanks, or Cronenberg's "Fly" from memory) and many more absolutely incredible treasures of cinema of the 70s, 80s and 90s. And one could once again watch the "Formula of Love" by Mark Zakharov or "Shirley-Myrli", comedies by Gaidai or Eyramdzhan, or some incomprehensible but atmospheric perestroika game.

But in parallel there were also series: "The X-Files", "Dr. Quinn: The Woman Doctor", "Highlander", "Lassie's New Adventures", "Detective Mike Hammer", "Moonlight Detective Agency", "Colombo", “The sorcerer. The Land of the Great Dragon”- the last one was shown during the day, it was an amazing Polish-Australian series with many adventures and different worlds. The Russian TV series "Bourgeois's Birthday" and "What the Dead Man Said" have been watched from A to Z. Now I don't watch TV shows at all. And then, I remember, I told my mother that I dream of doing nothing and watching films on TV all day. Basically, we can say that my dream has come true.

My first erotic film experience was not even connected with the film - it was a report from a factory that produced condoms in the form of characters from the cartoon "Well, wait a minute!" Yes, it was also shown on TV! And since childhood, I was interested in the question, why when they show action films and a scuffle on TV, the parents did not switch the channel, and when they showed erotic scenes, they always switched? Why are children protected from eroticism to a much greater extent than from violence?

Stephen Frears's Dangerous Liaisons was the first adult film. There was almost no eroticism as such, but it was clear that the whole film was "about it." Much later, I watched Kubrick's Eyes Wide Shut, where there are indeed spectacular erotic scenes. I still love this film for the atmosphere of the conspiracy (and the music of Shostakovich): I like how the hero follows his paranoia and, of course, according to the laws of paranoid thinking, he finds what he is looking for, at the same time his psychic route overlaps with the vicissitudes of the social order …

I started watching art mainstream and auteur films somewhere in the last grades of school and in the first years of the university. It so happened that I simultaneously studied at the Faculty of Journalism of Moscow State University, where the legendary film distribution “at Aunt Ira's” functioned, and at GITR as a director of television. At that time, I was interested in films that I had to think about, in which there was some kind of mystery. I almost physically remember the cold, steely feeling that the film "Autumn, Chertanovo …" left behind by Igor and Dmitry Talankin (Dmitry Igorevich was my master at GITR).

There I was also very carried away (and, in fact, influenced the choice of the further path) by Lyudmila Borisovna Klyueva's courses on film analysis, structuralist and post-structuralist theory of cinema. Later, having got into the first class of the Moscow School of New Cinema in the laboratory of Dmitry Mamulia and largely thanks to him, I rediscovered cinema for myself as a plastic visual art. Already more consciously, behind the structures, poetry was revealed, or, even more correctly, that truth that can be born from the very poetics of the image.

I appreciate a movie that captures and highlights the hidden "laws" of reality. What are these laws or, better to say, patterns? They are artistic in nature, because they are related to the most ancient forms of understanding life: myths, parables, legends and fairy tales. These are the laws of identity and difference, exchange and sacrifice, balance of power, alchemical mutation of the image. This is the main character's path to Colonel Kurtz's lair in Apocalypse Now. This is what makes up the tragedies of the characters Pasolini and Visconti. This is the whole life of Cabiria in one of her days with Fellini, the inevitability of murder in "Performance" and the fatalism of death in "Don't Look Now" by Nicholas Rogue.

There are still countless shameful gaps in my experience as a spectator, I am truly glad that I can simultaneously love the programs of Malakhov (both!) And the films of Rita Azevedo Gomes, the films of Angela Shanelek and Oleg Mavromatti. I am interested in fiction, documentary, and experimental films, and I see less and less sense in separating them altogether. I try to follow Russian cinema and I think it is important to pay attention to what is filmed where you grew up and live.

I think that it is very easy to get tired of cinema, it is often redundant and resource-intensive, but still it has the potential of an amazing capacity for speaking about the world. To truly love movies, you have to be attentive to your feelings. For example, not to let go of memory by inertia that embarrassed, that for some reason breaks out of the picture, follow your immediate feelings and thoughts while watching. The perception of cinema is a strange mixture of trust and mistrust at the same time.

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Paul Verhoeven, 1987

Robocop

Favorite childhood film made in the year I was born. And the plot, and the characters, and the robots in it are flawless. In every gesture - polished stainless steel criticism of the system, and all together - a great action-drama. Not so long ago I watched RoboCop on the big screen, and it was shivering. Those who saw me after the show thought that I was under something. But it was a movie!

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Alexander Dovzhenko, 1930

Land

A movie of powerful poetic power, flourishing and fruiting with weighty folk images. Vasily's dance, in my opinion, is an absolutely modern fragment in terms of language. With its performative capacity, it will give odds to much of what is now being shown at some "Forum" of the Berlinale.

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Kira Muratova, 1989

Asthenic syndrome

Films by Kira Georgievna Muratova are painfully beautiful and know a lot more about us than we do ourselves. For a long time, Mikhail Yampolsky's book about Muratova was my desktop, and about “Cognizing the White Light” I wrote the first published text about cinema. Asthenic Syndrome has amazingly accurate characters, lines, gestures - everything.

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Chantal Ackerman, 1993

From the east

Another subtle director and the most important film about a crucial time for Russia. The spatial uncertainty, the “homelessness” of Chantal Ackerman's films is here refracted as a loss in time. Camera passes by people waiting for a bus at a cold Moscow stop, footage in a half-asleep waiting room - an accurate visual metaphor for the position of a common man in the lasting moment of the collapse of eras.

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Bruno Dumont, 2017

Jeannette: Childhood of Jeanne d'Arc

Dumont is definitely a director with drive. With the films "The Life of Jesus" and "Humanity", although they were filmed in 1996 and 1999, he marked the beginning of the "cinema of the 2000s." At the same time, as a director and philosopher (philosophers are never former), Dumont methodically develops the problems he chose at the very beginning (anthropology, religion and morality) and aesthetics (antipsychologism and animality of characters, the northern province as a natural and social landscape). With the release of "Kid Kenken" it became absolutely clear that Dumont is not marking time at all, filigree humor and continues to analyze reality with his favorite means. Well, “The Childhood of Jeanne d'Arc” is generally a brilliant rock opera based on the score of the Life.

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Apitchatpon Weerasetakun, 2015

Graveyard of glitter

It is no coincidence that one of today's leading directors came to cinema from contemporary art. Virasetakuna's films are fantasy and light. This is a movie in ghost territory, but with a credible lining. All these ghosts are of this world - they live with us here and now. Children play football on the dug ground, in which everything that we constantly forget is buried. The final scene from "Cemetery of Glitter", where the heroine tries not to fall asleep, widening her eyes, we have to repeat every day.

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Anna Biller, 2016

Love witch

An enchanting feminist film showing the other side of the male fantasy about a woman who foresees and fulfills any male desire. A very smart, funny and beautiful movie, stylized as a 1970s camp. Its author is gorgeous Anna Biller, not only a director, but also a producer, costume designer and composer, and in her previous full-length film "Viva" she also played the main role.

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Chris Marker, 1962

Runway

Cinema is born not only from static footage of film set in motion, but also from time set in motion at the pace that the director gives it.Marker's Runway is an experimental film that, in its very form, contains an incredibly lyrical and inventive meditation on the power of memory, image and the very nature of cinema.

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Rainer Werner Fassbinder, 1976

Satanic Potion

The Good, the Bad, the Ugly Fassbinder shows us a character so pathetic that even laughter gets stuck in the throat. Mediocre and poor, but extremely ambitious writer Walter Krantz (prominent role of Kurt Raab) gives the last pennies of talent for his wretched atrocities, but the world around him is an indifferent satire, choked with his own farce. Here Fassbinder is not shy about anything and does not stand on ceremony at all: his poisonous spit reaches us after so many years and aptly falls into the most pampered and worst thing in us. While we are writing "genius materials", someone who prepares our food has a "tummy kaput".

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Eric Romer, 1991

Winter's tale

For this list, I could choose any other film by this author. Eric Romer is my favorite director. It's funny, because he seems to be the exact opposite of Fassbinder mentioned above. Romer's films shine with a gloss of bourgeois wealth and Catholic dogmatism. But this is not the main thing. The main thing is Romer's amazing knowledge of human nature, a sincere belief in miracles and the value of harmony that lives in each of his films. And "Winter's Tale" is one of the largest and evenest pearls in the necklace of his filmography. I am very proud that at one time I made a retrospective of Romer's Six Stories with Morality in Garage.

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Luis Buñuel, 1962

Exterminating angel

Luis Buñuel is a real titan, the smartest director with an amazing sense of humor. Buñuel went through the history of cinema, repeatedly changing the style and direction of work, but not changing himself. Today we have a lot to learn from many of his films, and Angel Slayer, in particular, is an example of classroom work with space, plot and ideology.

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Konstantin Voinov, 1964

The marriage of Balzaminov

I adore, I adore, I adore! I am ready to review as many times as I want from any place. The brilliant Georgy Vitsin, the brilliant Lyudmila Shagalova, Lydia Smirnova, Ekaterina Savinova, Nonna Mordyukova.

- There are no words for my love, sir. I would like to express it like that, but I just can't, sir!

- Have you been in love with me for a long time?

- Thursday afternoon, last week.

- So it’s recently!

- I can do more.

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Ulrike Oettinger, 1981

Freak Orlando

An extremely strange and even more wonderful movie. Ottinger's associations and images walk on their own: this is a parade of jesters and freaks, a march of cardboard kings and plastic gods. "Freak Orlando" is a movie of absolutely its time: punk, uncompromising, free (which cost only costumes). Such a movie was possible at the dawn of the 1980s, and now it is only Bruce la Bruce and Paul McCarthy who are doing it, and even then much more modestly.

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Alexander Rastorguev, 2005

Wild, wild beach. The heat of the tender

The sweating, overweight, drunken, aching and light yearning of the Russian man for happiness. “The heroes of the film have landed on this shitty Citéra,” as Mikhail Ratgauz wrote in my favorite film dedicated to this film, “to smear a thin strip of butter on the stale bread of his life that he had allocated on this coast.” I don't know what to add. Alexander Rastorguev is the main Russian documentary filmmaker of this century. His death is an irreparable loss.

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Pier Paolo Pasolini, 1962

Sheep cheese

For this short film, which was included in the famous film almanac about the end of the world "Rogopagus", Pier Paolo Pasolini was almost imprisoned on charges of, as they would say now, "offending the feelings of believers." They managed to pay off the prison with a fine. Subsequently, the charges were dropped, although with this film Pasolini was able to make it quite clear what he thinks about modern society and the role of religion in it. As a result, we have a short-length masterpiece about the fate of a poor man serving in extras on the set of a glamorous filmopus about the Passion of Christ.The bitter irony of this short film is enough for a dozen full meters. Pasolini is a genius.

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Derek Jarman, 1993

Blue

A hypnotic movie show, joy, pain, freedom and memory, showing through a blue screen. And who said that a film cannot take place without a moving image? Everything that moves is already within us.

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