New Name: Computer Engineer Katie Bauman

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New Name: Computer Engineer Katie Bauman
New Name: Computer Engineer Katie Bauman
Video: New Name: Computer Engineer Katie Bauman
Video: Wells Fargo Recruitment 2021 | Software Engineer | Bachelor of Computer Engineering | Off Campus 2023, February
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IN THE RUBRIC "NEW NAME" we talk about promising newcomers: musicians, directors, artists and others - that is, everyone whose name appears more and more often on the pages of magazines, in social media feeds and in our conversations, and who is clearly on the verge of great success.

Katie Bauman

WHO IS IT: computer engineer, who, even during her postgraduate studies at The Massachusetts Institute of Technology began work on the CHIRP algorithm - in particular, thanks to which they obtained the first-ever image of a black hole

The worldwide newsfeed snapshot of the shadow of a supermassive black hole - confirming that black holes do exist and not just feed the imaginations of science fiction writers - was made possible by an accurate prediction made by a computer engineer named Katie Bauman.

Bauman is twenty-nine years old, and she became interested in the Event Horizon Telescope project back in school in 2007, after which she entered the University of Michigan and graduated with honors in 2011. Then, moving to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Bauman began developing computer systems for creating images that cannot be obtained using traditional methods. Three years ago, she began to build an algorithm that would allow solving a seemingly impossible task: to photograph an object that cannot be seen, since it does not emit anything.

It would take a telescope the size of the Earth just to capture the shadow of a black hole, but Bauman and her colleagues found another practical solution, which she talked about three years ago in her Ted lecture. Her calculations turned out to be correct, and it was they who allowed the Event Horizon Telescope to obtain a historical image, thanks to which we learned that a black hole absorbing a highly heated gas looks like Sauron's eye or a donut.

COVER: people.csail.mit

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