From Fantasy To Family Chronicles: 7 Epic Sagas To Read All The Holidays

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From Fantasy To Family Chronicles: 7 Epic Sagas To Read All The Holidays
From Fantasy To Family Chronicles: 7 Epic Sagas To Read All The Holidays

Video: From Fantasy To Family Chronicles: 7 Epic Sagas To Read All The Holidays

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Whatever your lazy vacation plans during the May holidays - lying on the beach by the sea or on the couch at home - you can't do without a fascinating book. Holidays are long, so we have chosen seven weighty epic book cycles in which you can dive headlong and not emerge until the end of May.

Text: Dina Klyuchareva

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Ian Macdonald

Moon

Science fiction master Ian MacDonald's Moon trilogy includes New Moon, Wolf Moon and Moonrise (the latter will be published soon by AST). The moon of the future is a tough world of competition between industrial corporations owned by five families of terrestrial origin - the Five Dragons of the Moon. The Russian Vorontsovs are in charge of the transportation of people and resources, the Chinese Sun work in the field of high technologies, the Asmoa originating from Ghana manage the agricultural industry, the Brazilians of Korta extract helium, which is the basis of the Earth, and the Australians of Mackenzie - minerals and metals. Earthly rules do not apply on the Moon: gravity is different here, human bodies grow and behave differently, for four vital resources - water, air, carbon (to print household items and clothes in 3D printers) and information - you have to pay, and instead of the Criminal Code, contracts and deals rule the polyamorous and polysexual society.

The Moon Trilogy is often compared to Weir's The Martian in terms of the amount of technically plausible detail and Game of Thrones in terms of intrigue. Here is the same endless struggle for leadership and control over the entire Moon between clans, strategic alliances and marriages of convenience between representatives of different dynasties. The metaphorical tug of the carpet of power will ultimately end in an incredible domed clan massacre, followed by brutal revenge and devastating catharsis - when it turns out that the destructive conflict was not provoked by those who were suspected.

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Philip Pullman

Dark beginnings

This year, the BBC will release a series-adaptation of the fantasy cycle Dark Beginnings - this is perhaps the second most important television event of the year after the conclusion of Game of Thrones. It's time to read the trilogy, which has earned the status of a cult work in its genre along with Harry Potter, The Lord of the Rings and The Chronicles of Narnia. "Dark beginnings" is often criticized for the author's intolerance of the church and the not childishly gloomy and cruel atmosphere of the story. Science, religion and magic are closely intertwined in the worlds of Pullman, the characters are voluminous and complex, and the dynamic and intense plot can deprive you of sleep for several nights in a row.

"Dark beginnings" is a chronicle of the growing up of two children, Lyra Belaqua and Will Parry, who roam the strange cities of magical and cruel parallel worlds. The story begins with the disappearance of Lyra's friend, in search of whom she sets out on a journey. She will have the most incredible acquaintances (for example, with witches, gypsies and armored bears) and meeting with dangers, she will learn what the dust that threatens to destroy all worlds, and will reveal the secret of her own origin. Later, she will meet Will, who lives in a world similar to ours, and finds a way to easily move between worlds. The books grow up with the heroes - by the end of the trilogy, Lyra and Will have to solve the not childish problems of the moral choice between good and evil.

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Mary Margaret Kay

Distant tents

A voluminous cognitive saga of two books ("Palace of the Winds" and "Indian Princess") about a sense of duty, love and the horrors of imperialism against the backdrop of the picturesque landscapes of India, Afghanistan and England of the 19th century. Ashton became an orphan early and grew up in the Himalayas with a poor Indian woman.Tanned and dark-haired, he considers himself an Indian all his life, until the nurse before dying confesses that he is a descendant of British aristocrats, and he should go home. Submitting to fate, he goes to England and receives an education in order to return to India and understand that he is not considered one of his own anywhere. Among the British, he is a stranger; among the locals, he is an invader and a white lord. His life becomes more difficult when he falls in love with one of the two Indian princesses, whom he accompanies to a wedding in another principality.

"Distant Tents" will appeal to those who appreciate nostalgic romance like "Gone with the Wind" and "Singing in the Thorns", which in this case is complemented by poetic descriptions of the nature of distant lands, customs and religious rites.

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Elizabeth Jane Howard

Chronicle of the Kazalet family

A leisurely family saga of five parts (the first three have been translated into Russian) opens with a book called "Carefree Years." The story begins in 1937 on the eve of World War II, which at that moment seems so far away. The focus is on three generations of the Kazalet family: elderly parents living with an adult single daughter, and their three sons with their own wives and children, as well as numerous servants, friends and acquaintances. Their summer is cloudless, suburban life is boring, worries are daily, but the war is getting closer - and now residents are being handed out gas masks, trenches are being dug in London, and queues are lining up to euthanize pets. In subsequent books, the action takes place in 1939 and 1942, when the anxiety and chaos of martial law become a familiar picture of the day.

The Chronicle of the Kazalet Family is praised not only for its epic scope and inevitable resemblance to Downton Abbey, but also for its believable depiction of everyday life in England before and at the height of World War II, when age-old aristocratic traditions were rapidly becoming obsolete and abolished under martial law. Despite the retroflora, the heroes and heroines of the book are worried about quite timeless problems: from decaying marriage and aging to unwanted pregnancy and incest.

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Kerstin Gere

Timeless

The trilogy of gems by the writer Kerstin Gere (Ruby, Emerald and Sapphire) contains all the necessary elements of a fascinating fantastic young adult reading, from which you do not want to raise your head: a nosy heroine who opposes tradition, a lovable antagonist who sooner or later turns into her love interest, assorted relatives - helpers and spiteful critics, secret societies, balls and soires, mysterious alchemical devices and time travel.

Sixteen-year-old Gwendoline discovers that she inherited the time traveler gene from her great-grandmother - at first she moves chaotically and unpredictably, but soon learns how to control hert. The more she travels, the less she realizes what a dangerous secret her family is keeping. All threads lead to the past to the very Count Saint-Germain, who fosters an insidious plan to become the master of the source of eternal life.

Surprisingly, a frivolous magical plot does not make the book a one-time reading: historical signs of different eras are spelled out in detail and reliably, the pace of adventures does not slow down for a minute, and Gwendolyn herself is not a superheroine, but a completely ordinary girl who is worried about a broken heart and looks films with Cate Blanchett instead of taking lessons (yes, we all do).

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Stephen King

Bill Hodges Trilogy

The chilling cycle of psychological thrillers about detective Bill Hodges was Stephen King's first experience in the detective genre - and so successful that it was filmed in the form of the TV series "Mr. Mercedes", where the role of Hodges is played by the colorful Brendan Gleeson.Despite the absence of the usual paranormal surroundings, King masterfully brings horror and once again proves that the worst thing is not fantastic monsters, but monsters that live inside ordinary people.

In April 2009, a luxury Mercedes crashed into a crowd of unemployed, leaving eight dead and fifteen injured. It falls to Kermit William Hodges, a tired, divorced, overweight policeman of sixty-two, to investigate. The car is found, but the killer, nicknamed Mister Mercedes, is not, and after six months of fruitless searches, Hodges gives up, retires and begins to die at home from boredom and contemplate suicide. But it was not so - the former policeman begins to receive letters, so detailed that Hodges understands that only the killer could write them. With the help of a young computer computer neighbor and sister of one of the victims of Mr. Mercedes, he begins his own investigation and searches for the killer.

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Dina Rubina

Russian canary

The action of the multi-layered trilogy begins in the pre-war period and maneuvers between the vicissitudes in the life of several generations of two vast families from Odessa and Almaty. Pre-revolutionary life, a large wave of emigration, the horrors of war, perestroika - against the background of the turbulent history of the 20th century, a clash of two worlds, West and East, and a big love story are taking place, which in the end will turn into a spy thriller with chases. Each hero of the saga, wherever they are - in the sultry steppe or stifling humid Odessa, hot Bangkok or Israel - has its own mystery and pain, and an impossible love for music, be it the melody of an instrument, the voice of an opera soloist or the roulades of a songbird.

In some places, the trilogy seems a bit drawn out, but this feeling quickly dissolves as the scenery changes. What cannot be taken away from Canary is Rubina's subtle psychological flair, her ability to write charming and tangible characters and her signature colorful language.

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